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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need some help guys. Somebody here a while back posted some flies where he used fur spun in dubbing loop to make a sort of one sided brush to wrap around a fly and give it 360 deg coverage and the effect of spey hackle with fur.

So what does a knucklehead like myself do? I jump in and start tying tubes with this method. They came out nice and look great in the water. HOWEVER, on BIG problem... I was out yesterday trying to kill cabin fever and swim these flies. After about an hour, there was no fur left! The fur from the dubbing loop slipped out with casting!

Any ideas of how I can get it to stay? I was using coyote and puppy, I mean temple dog.

Thank you!
 

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Wax the loop before adding the fur to it and slide the twists in the loop up to the fur with your fingers after you spin your dubbing twister, this really locks it in because your forcing all the tension from the twisting onto the material. Also make sure your not using too much material in a small loop, be sure to use a bodkin and spread it out before you spin it up. Hope that helps.

Vincent
 

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Yes, Jerry French has a could of good video's on loops.

The wax helps setting up the loop to begin with, giving the thread enough tac to help in placing the material. But if you're loosing material in the water, it sounds like it's a combination of the material being too dense within the loop, not spun tightly enough, and/or not bound down tightly.
 

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Matt Arciaga
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It may have been me?

Mike said above, wax loop, use strong thread, (GSP) if you don't mind. Slip the fur in spread thin. Take extremely sharp scissors and cut the butt ends as close to the thread loop as possible. Flatten the butt ends with finger. Start to spin slow until good tension is applied, then let the spinner rip. I suggest using a roto dubber to do this since you can freely spin while having good tension. Once its spun, brush out the trapped hairs, spin a little.more, brush again and then take some water or spit and apply from the base of the fur and start to slick to one side. Once that's done you have that one aided brush you seek, wrap untill your happy tie it off. I might have a video. I'll look
 

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The dubbing wax really helps as well as the combination of different textures material adds some give within the loop. Of course adequate tension when the loop is spun.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Dom
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Spread the material in your loop a bit. I never use wax, ever. Spread, spin, brush, wrap. You have to "learn" your thread and establish the feel of it up to what point you can spin it without it breaking.

Spey hackle is wrong terminology to use.
 

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Matt Arciaga
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Spey hackle is wrong terminology to use.
Which is exactly why I placed "spey hackle" in quotations.

Truth be told, if were getting technical, spey hackle would only be properly named to coque tail and heron, as these were the only referenced hackles I've been able to find used to develop the "spey river flies". Today's burnt goose, schlappen and whatever else we modern day fly tyers use and name it "spey" hackles are all in the same improperly named "spey hackle" termed category. .
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Guys,


Thanks for all your input. What I learned most is to NOT make the hair in the loop too dense - it has to be more on the sparse side. I will try using Cobblers wax as well - somebody suggested it will firm up and help hold the hair - we'll see. I will thin the fur pinches out more than I was. I am trying to tighten the loops as much as possible without the fur over wrapping too much.

I'll keep you posted...
 
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