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Scott, Winston, Burkheimer, Beulah, Meiser rods. Galvan, Nautilus, Orvis and Lamson reels.
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Discussion Starter #1
Speaking hypothetically, if you could have a pair of rods to cover your winter steelhead fishing in the PNW, what two would they be? Why?
 

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Scott, Winston, Burkheimer, Beulah, Meiser rods. Galvan, Nautilus, Orvis and Lamson reels.
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Discussion Starter #5
Meiser 13’ 7/8 MKX - it does everything I need it to.

I don’t really want or need a second. I like the 13’6” model a lot too.
I was fairly certain I'd get this answer at least once.
 

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My Bobby Clay "Kispiox" gets a lot of use on small to mid sized coastal rivers where I know there is a good chance of my Winter fish to be over 10 # ... I simply luv the action, and it rips **** ... !!!

In truth <> Your's is a broad question ... PNW Winter fisheries are an extremely broad category ... Klamath to Skagit <> Tidal estuaries to up-stream feeders ... What's your game ?!

Do you like Blondes or Red Heads ... Bourbon or Scotch ... Do conditions require a .223 or a 30.06 ... !!!

The best answer is almost always based on a good question ...

... Define your question a bit better and you'll get more specific answers ...

Meiz
 

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Beulah 11'6 Classic 6/7 It has become part of me....or me part of it. Another, longer, rod might boom a Skagit out there a bit further, and I have some. But I have picked this one up 95% of the time over the past two or three winters.

My 2nd pick? I don't know the answer to that one. I have several rods I like....but none I'm married to.
 

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Meiser MKS 13 1/2 foot 8/9
Fly Logic FLO+ 1409-4

These two are my winter standards. But a brilliant new acquisition is insinuating itself into the lineup: a CND 13' 7" 7/8/9 BV-GT. (It's really a dead-solid eight weight.)

My preferences are a bit heavier in line weights than the average winter steelheader seems to favor. It's my response to an unsolvable paradox: when pursuing winter steelhead, there is a very slight but real chance of hooking into a colossus, a monster. Losing such a lifetime fish due to inadequate tackle is not to be endured, not if it can be avoided. :ROFLMAO:
 

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Meiser MKS 13 1/2 foot 8/9
Fly Logic FLO+ 1409-4

These two are my winter standards. But a brilliant new acquisition is insinuating itself into the lineup: a CND 13' 7" 7/8/9 BV-GT. (It's really a dead-solid eight weight.)

My preferences are a bit heavier in line weights than the average winter steelheader seems to favor. It's my response to an unsolvable paradox: when pursuing winter steelhead, there is a very slight but real chance of hooking into a colossus, a monster. Losing such a lifetime fish due to inadequate tackle is not to be endured, not if it can be avoided. :ROFLMAO:
I'm with you on that. Plus, you hook a 15+ with a 5 or even a 6 wt, and that doesn't seem fair to the fish to me. Get them in and back on their way asap.
 

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Scott, Winston, Burkheimer, Beulah, Meiser rods. Galvan, Nautilus, Orvis and Lamson reels.
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Discussion Starter #14
My Bobby Clay "Kispiox" gets a lot of use on small to mid sized coastal rivers where I know there is a good chance of my Winter fish to be over 10 # ... I simply luv the action, and it rips **** ... !!!

In truth <> Your's is a broad question ... PNW Winter fisheries are an extremely broad category ... Klamath to Skagit <> Tidal estuaries to up-stream feeders ... What's your game ?!

Do you like Blondes or Red Heads ... Bourbon or Scotch ... Do conditions require a .223 or a 30.06 ... !!!

The best answer is almost always based on a good question ...

... Define your question a bit better and you'll get more specific answers ...

Meiz
I like bourbon on the banks of a stream with a loyal dog and scotch in front of the fireplace with friends. If blondes and redheads are in the mix then I guess it should be champagne. I’ll skip the rifle question. I prefer bird hunting.

i guess I could make my question OP-centric.
 

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18 foot spey rod DV8
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My Bobby Clay "Kispiox" gets a lot of use on small to mid sized coastal rivers where I know there is a good chance of my Winter fish to be over 10 # ... I simply luv the action, and it rips **** ... !!!

In truth <> Your's is a broad question ... PNW Winter fisheries are an extremely broad category ... Klamath to Skagit <> Tidal estuaries to up-stream feeders ... What's your game ?!

Do you like Blondes or Red Heads ... Bourbon or Scotch ... Do conditions require a .223 or a 30.06 ... !!!

The best answer is almost always based on a good question ...

... Define your question a bit better and you'll get more specific answers ...Meiz
My winter steelheading involves the Great Lakes variety of migratory rainbows, and fishing smaller tribs like the Credit, Maitland, Saugeen, while also facing the challenge of the mighty Niagara River.

I prefer my 12 and 13 foot Sharpes Spliced cane rods for fishing silk or modern lines with 50 to 80 foot heads to help avoid the scourge of winter fishing, iced up guides and wet numb hands. Casting and fishing these medium or grand spey lines, and elevating the running or mono shooting above the water and keeping it dry, you reduce stripping and handling, and shooting cold wet line.

While fishing the Niagara River, at the Bar, or below the Falls, while wading or in a boat, I use traditional length spey rods from 16 to 18 feet, to deal with longer casts to cover the water, and the variety of sinking lines necessary to present your fly from 10 to 25 feet down in the swift surface currents above the rock gardens, boulders, troughs, or the gravel bars. My favorites are the Scott MacKenzie DTX graphites, the B & W Norways, and the Harry Jamison Clan Rods.

The Upper Niagara is a different mistress, broad, shallow, and unsophisticated. Dry lines or intermediates excell here with Far and Fine Off traditional spey casting and fishing techniques. These longer rods easily allow 150 foot plus casts to reach untouched pot holes, current seams, and rock ledges, and then leading and mending the fly, while elevating the running line above the water to avoid icing up.

These longer spey wands also keep the fly well away from the angler during sudden down stream wind gusts above the Falls and those that are accelerated through the down stream gorge which can act as a wind tunnel.

Regards from the Restigouche....Jim
 

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I will say that soon after I finished wrapping my MKX I took it out to my local river hoping for the rare June fish - either a late winter or an early summer as both can be around. I soon found a fish and after 20 minutes of fighting it and really putting a bend in that new graphite I eased a 20#+ bright chinook onto its side in the shallows. I knew then two things - I loved the rod and I would never be under-gunned on winter steel.
 

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CND Skagit specialist
CND BV GT steelhead specialist
CND 15'2" Solstice
once I wrap it the 13'6" 7/8 MKS will be added to the line up!
 

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The past couple winters I've enjoyed fising a Burkie 8134 on a number of different winter rivers I frequent. Throws tips and winter flies with NC Steelhead Finder 45 like a champ. I recently added a Winston 7123 for tighter quarters and small-mid sized rivers and think it will find a permanent home in the quiver.
 

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Scott, Winston, Burkheimer, Beulah, Meiser rods. Galvan, Nautilus, Orvis and Lamson reels.
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Discussion Starter #20
Winston is not getting enough love. Winter: BIII TH 7129/7133. Summer: 6126.
One end of my winter arsenal is anchored by the BIII TH 8136. Using Mr. Meiser’s rifle analogy I think it’s a .300 magnum.
 
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