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Having just seen the undeniable effect of adding a shiny bead in front of a swung intruder to attract a salmon's attention, I was wondering who is practicing these dirty tricks and has any recommendations ;)

May be useful when the fishing gets tough...
 

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to me it is like people that use an attractor fly above the fly at the end of the line
kind of like the guy that ties a fly on his spinning rod and catches a fish and then places his fly
rod next to the fish and then takes his pic
 

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JD
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Depends, I guess, on how bad you want to catch a fish. I remember all kinds of "dirty" little tricks like that. Pinning beads on the leader ahead of the fly is not uncommon in Alaska. But then consider the situation. A good majority of those "fly fishers" have never fly fished before. They know or care nothing of ethics, they just want to catch some Salmon. They bring those techniques home with them & justify them because "that's what the guides showed us in Alaska" It never occurs to them the guides are in it for the money (tips) & hope they all return next year as naive as last year.
 

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An egg-sucking leech is essentially the same thing. I don't know what fish see in it - but seem to like it.
It's a bit of POP is what I call it. Fishermen and flytyers have been doing it for centuries.
If you look at many of Blacker's patterns that have been recorded in literature, they encompass bright wool heads, set as a "bright spot". There are many patterns both vintage and modern that use this same technique, whether at the front or at the rear of the pattern.

If the "bead" is weighted, that's a different scenario. Adding weight to the fly that will aid in the sink of the fly, or help keep it down in the fish's zone. Extremely important when fishing cold water.

In my eyes, it's a tactic, not a "cheat". If it's about the weight, one should check the local regulations to see if a weight is permitted by the local laws and regulations first before hand.


Mike
 

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It's a bit of POP is what I call it. Fishermen and flytyers have been doing it for centuries.
If you look at many of Blacker's patterns that have been recorded in literature, they encompass bright wool heads, set as a "bright spot". There are many patterns both vintage and modern that use this same technique, whether at the front or at the rear of the pattern.

If the "bead" is weighted, that's a different scenario. Adding weight to the fly that will aid in the sink of the fly, or help keep it down in the fish's zone. Extremely important when fishing cold water.

In my eyes, it's a tactic, not a "cheat". If it's about the weight, one should check the local regulations to see if a weight is permitted by the local laws and regulations first before hand.


Mike
I dig your idea of pop, Mike.

I believe you using color theory there , in complementary and contrasting color.
 

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I ain't ashamed to admit it; I incorporate those plastic beads into my fishing when the water is high and cold. My go to ESL pattern is on a shank with an 8mm bead at the head, spun deer hair prop, and a couple wraps of marabou. Sometimes I'll even slide a bead on to the leader ahead of an intruder in the fall when the steelhead are keyed in on eggs.
 

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My first Steelhead on the swing was on an ESL cone head. Definelty didn’t feel like a “cheat” on that day! :)

I’m gonna say that the hot spot on a green butt skunk and a thousand other more kosher flies serves the same exact purpose.
 
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