Spey Pages banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
588 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am new at this game. I will be using a 12'6" 6 weight rod. Most of the water I fish is less than 5 feet deep. I want to cast for distance to cover more water. I want to use streamer flies for trout and steelhead. I will have to use some type of sink tip for the streamers. What line is easier to cast and will get done what I need? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Hi smsnyder, I am also new, but will give it a shot. Both line types are shooting heads, that is eelatively short spey lines that can be used with interchangeable tips or polyleaders (floating or sinking of various rates). Skagits are short fat and heavy heads that shoot far and are easy to use with fast sinking tips and heavy flies, while Scandi heads also shoot good distance while being a bit longrr with more gradual taper which produces a more delicate delivery of slower sink tips and lighter flies. I've heard skagit is easier to learn(not sure if its true), but more importantly is the type of fly and sink tip you intend to use. A bit more info on your intentions would be usefull.
what rate sink tips do you intend to use? What size flies? Weighted flies? That will all be determining in best tool for the job.

Hope this helps and that more experienced posters will correct me if I'm wrong about anything!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,937 Posts
There is always a compromise! Things which incease casting distance are heavier line head, longer line head and touch&go casting!

You don't need to use a sinking line or sink tip to sink streamers which are slim and have some weight in the head and/or strong and short hook when you use long mono and thin leader which water resistance is low so fly sinks fast head first. This kind of fly also pulls leader straight in the end of the cast when fly has some speed when the line loop advances to the leader junction.

Easiest casting Spey line is very short shooting head and at least rod length mono leader which is cast using Underhand technicue which Goran Andersson made famous. Line head can be only two times rod length and it is easy to lift and back cast to the D-loop using very upright rod. Pace is not much faster than on a Roll Cast. But proper Drift should be done when D-loop forms.

Esa
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,732 Posts
I would say they are pretty much equally easy and what you want to differentiate is the style of casting you are doing - there are essentially two types of casts - sustained anchor (water borne) casts and touch and go (T&G) casts with variations for each and you can use either method with either line. The heavier your grain weight for a particular rod rating scale the better sustained anchor will be and the least favorable would be T&G. I am not convinced that you can cast further with T&G casts and T&G is a bit harder to master as timing is more critical

As suggested by Simon, Skagit lines are certainly used for delivering heavy flies and sink tips but will work fine when using floating tips and lighter flies while scandi lines do well with lighter tips and flies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,007 Posts
Also - the Nextcast Winter Authority is a nice "in-betweener." Most of the weight on these tapers is in the rear. With the floating tip it is very much like a scandi-head. Remove the floating tip and it still has enough mass for sink tips. Depending on grains you choose for your rod it can handle fairly big streamers and large bulky flies. Winter Authority 45 would be good for the length of rod.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
scandi vs skagit

I am new at this game. I will be using a 12'6" 6 weight rod. Most of the water I fish is less than 5 feet deep. I want to cast for distance to cover more water. I want to use streamer flies for trout and steelhead. I will have to use some type of sink tip for the streamers. What line is easier to cast and will get done what I need? Thanks
What size streamers u throwing? That could determine the line u throw
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top