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loco alto!
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Discussion Starter #1
I was reading around Blanton's site about depth compensated lines and came across the following post by Bruce Richards of SA. If you can believe that river current pulls on the line during the swing, then I think the post makes a pretty good case for depth compensated sink tips being overrated when swinging flies. I'll continue to chop up shooting heads and full DT sinkers...

"Ron,
DC sinking lines do minimize belly sag vs. std. sinking lines. How important that might be to you depend on a couple things. The slower you retrieve the more important DC is. Also, it is more important in slower sinking lines than fast sinking lines.

The faster you retrieve the quicker the whole line pulls level with the line belly. If you retrieve slowly, the belly may continue sinking, but the tip will stay higher considerably longer.

Slower sinking lines often have a larger difference in sink rate between tip and belly than faster sinking lines so the "belly sag" problem is worse.

If you are fishing a slow retrieve with slow sinking lines, DC is critical. If you are stripping streamers fast with a fast sinking line, save your money."
Bruce Richards
 

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well i certainly believe what he says, but how am i saving money buying a sa line over a rio? or just a reg tip over a dc in general?
 

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loco alto!
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3,052 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Its not about buying pre-made tips. Its about buying shooting heads or full DT sinking lines, usually on the cheap, and chopping for tips.

I've bought several 90' DT sinking lines for around $15 - that's $2.50 per sinktip.
 

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For me it's about density, not DC

Bruce's explanation makes sense to me. I think the most important recent development is the higher density/smaller diameter tip materials. I've fished both the Rio Type 8 and some of Airflo's products. Whether I'm stripping streamers in the summer or swinging in the cold of winter, the higher density-for-weight tip materials let us get more depth with lighter rods and lines, which makes for more comfortable fishing and more fun fish fighting.

Just yesterday I had the good fortune to talk with Simon when I called Rio for some "tech advice". The old Big Boy 300 sank at about 5.5ips. With the change to new materials in the last year, the current BB 300 sinks at 7.3 ips, and the BB 200 sinks at 5.5ips. It's nice to be able to do with 200 grains what used to take 300. Easier casting and makes the fight better, IMO. By the way, you can tell the new material in the Rio lines b/c the sink rate is on the label on the newer ones, not on the old--according to Simon.
Carl
 
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