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Hooked4life
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Nice post!

Peter:
Great dry line post! I couldn't have explained it better. What you describe are the things that have come intuitively and through experience for me and you did a wonderful job of putting it into words. The dynamics of going for maximum depth vs. minimun depth are things the dry line steelheader goes through over the course of the day. For instance, at times, I'm guilty of going into "autopilot", fishing for max depth full time, then realize I needed to make adjustments to my presentation. An example is after losing a couple 5/0 Winter's Hopes on the bottom when getting into a shallower, softer section of a run, I remember that such water fishes the fly too deep if I don't keep enough tension on the swing and give less sinktime on the setup.

Dry line swinging is one of those things that takes actual "doing" for one to really learn it. One can talk about the mechanics of the method, but nothing beats hands on learning. It kind of reminds me of mechanical things, like working or cars or trying to fix other stuff. It seems intimidating at first, but when one actually puts their hands on things, the realization can come that hey, this makes sense and it can be done.

Best,
Todd
 

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I is a School of Hi Grad
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.. not the only ways?

Good post peter.

couple other a ways I achieve a deep fly sink and swing.

1) downstream angled cast where the turnover doesn't complete, the leader/tippet lands in heap and then we feed a little line. No mend of any type.


2) downstream angled cast, then a big "sloppy" pull back mend that creates slack/ripples in the line and leader/tippet and we feed a little line too.



Of course as you state, need a skinney FC leader/tippet and fly that sinks well and has a tendancy to stay down.
 

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Hooked4life
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Discussion Starter #8
One of these days I'll have to set up and video a test to demonstrate the depth keeping of various setups. I think the shallowness that some rigs run would surprise a lot of people.
 

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I is a School of Hi Grad
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Feeding line is similar to an upstream mend in that the swinging is minimized until the fed line slack goes tight.
 

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Hooked4life
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Feeding line is similar to an upstream mend in that the swinging is minimized until the fed line slack goes tight.
I use that method as well, usually when the swing is about to come tight and I slowly slip some line to extend the low tension part of the swing.
 

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Excellent, Peter. I read through there and skimmed over Scott/Wood's work. I think you nailed near the end with your statement "Moderate swing speed via adjusting tension using the rod tip position."

Sometimes I wonder if there is a misunderstanding of the term "greased-line" and/or how it applies to steelhead and the deep wet fly swing.
 

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Hooked4life
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Discussion Starter #12
Excellent, Peter. I read through there and skimmed over Scott/Wood's work. I think you nailed near the end with your statement "Moderate swing speed via adjusting tension using the rod tip position."

Sometimes I wonder if there is a misunderstanding of the term "greased-line" and/or how it applies to steelhead and the deep wet fly swing.
Having read Jock Scott you'll know this, but for the rest, a "greased line" refers to the practice of making silk lines float by spreading on Mucilin. An undressed silk line will behave like an intermediate, so it was necessary to 'grease them up' to make them float. Greased line fishing was the art of swinging a wet fly, either close to the surface or deep, using a greased, floating silk line. In terms of modern plastic lines, the same label and techniques can be applied to fishing with a floating line and a wet fly.
 

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Nice...

Nice article Peter. Very clear. For deeper presentations do you fish this way exclusivly? And what are the pros and cons?
 

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Hooked4life
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Nice article Peter. Very clear. For deeper presentations do you fish this way exclusivly? And what are the pros and cons?
I use a mixed bag of techniques, in part because because I like to change things up, but mainly due to my local river running dirty much of the time. I like using this method mostly in clearer conditions where a greater fly choice becomes available.

Whether I go deep with this method or use a tip, is governed by conditions. I need clarity, a consistent current and a bottom without rocky surprises to use the deep wet fly swing. A lot of the runs in my local river are strewn with outcrops of bedrock, so I have to use tube flies with upturned points, which in turn forces the use of tips or polyleaders.

In runs that have less of these fly eaters, then I can go to my my downforce flies and the deep wet fly swing.

The big benefit of the deep wet fly swing is primarily enjoyment. The casting is more fun, I need to pay more attention and it stimulates the fishing imagination and creativity. I can't go on auto pilot.

The downside is that it is not a method that we can use with great consistency. Small variations in casting and mending can make the difference between a good presentation and a snagged up fly. Which is why I like clearer conditions. Then I can run the fly a bit higher and the fish will still take it. I don't have to run it in the stones as I would in dirty conditions.
 
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