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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After reading many of the different threads on making Skagit style lines still not to sure of how to get started. It looks like the way to go I have a 8133 and 9144.
 

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loco alto!
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My name is Steve and I am a recovering splice-aholic. I've got lots of money sunk into various sections of this and that, $10 here, $20 there, to the point where I'm certain that I've both learned a lot about line design, and spent more money than is really necessary to have a good time fishing. I still use a few of my custom lines on a regular basis, but mostly not. You really have to want to splice for the learning process itself, because otherwise you are probably better off simply buying one of the many good lines already available. Unless learning about line tapers is your goal, my advice is to find a factory skagit line that works for your rod, then fine tune it. Riveraddict had a useful post about this recently.
 

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Agreed

Chuckie

I agree with Steve, I have a lot invested in making custom lines (dollars and time) and unless you are really interested in making your lines, it is much less costly to just buy the factory lines. Rio just came out with Skagit heads without the running lines for around $45. Airflow has had the same for a year or so and SA is about to do the same. Pick the grain wt you think your rods will take (you can consult the new Rio Spey line site that Simon just put up and get an idea of an approx grain wt for your rods and then adjust as you want. Not trying to steer you away from custom lines (I learned a lot from the years I spent making them) but be prepared to spend time and dollars. What is very useful from learning about making them has been the ability to know how to cut or not cut and how to do it with the new factory lines.

Rphelps:smokin:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks but still would like to learn

really always interested on the how to , where , wasn't really worried about the how much, but thanks for your concern rphelps , and ssspey. Always trying to learn more about the sport. Any information would be great.
 

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loco alto!
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there is a ton of information in the archives if you use the search function.

In particular, try to find a post by Riveraddict on skagit lines for trout speys. I have found that the taper he gives scales up well to building heavier lines.
 

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Personally, I have spent too much money on lines (and rods and reels and...), but it was the only way for me to learn about lines. Measureing and weighing lines was the only way for me to get my mind around the differences between brands, styles, philosophies etc.

Get a copy of Al Burh's line building book. I saw it for sale on the net at one of the sponsors website (red shed or Aaron's or the Welches fly shop). It has a ton of info.

Ask questions here. I have got some great advice.

Then go "save" some money by buying three or four lines, cut them up to make just one!

When you catch a fish on a line you designed it is sweet.
 

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Junkyard Spey
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really always interested on the how to , where , wasn't really worried about the how much,


Chuckie you sound like a fly shop owner's dream. If you are really interested in making your own lines Al's book will be an invaluable tool. You should also get a grain scale, a set of calipers or a mic., a pinvise, and maybe a line winder. Poppy's line splicing kit has a lot of the items you need. Also you will need some lines. If you really want to build your own lines in a serious way Aaron @ River Run Angler's has 100' coils of the various sizes.

Chopping and gluing lines can be expensive but it is also a lot of fun. It can't be to hard as I did my first one sitting in the seat of a running semi on the edge of I-70 at the CO/UT border. I have customers that roll into the shop and say "this line is casting like s%&^%%t this morning". They roll it off on a line winder and chop some line out or add some in and head back to the river, all in the course of a half hour. Sometimes it (the line) works better and sometimes it doesn't.

Here are a few places for some info:
http://www.enthusiastmedia.com/php/...th/83?osCsid=356f3556fc65752826a6c4bd468aa29b

http://www.flyfishusa.com/steelheadquarters/spey-lines/perfect-line/speyline.html

http://www.redshedflyshop.com/LINESLOOPS.html
 

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Like Steve, in the pre-factory skagit days, based on info from posters here , starting five years ago , more or less, I spent a fortune in $and time reworking old lines(luckily an old Orvis outlet had many big weight double tapers for $5 each)...all in prursuit of the Skagit type line. I still fish the line I created. It was a pain to get it though and buying one from Poppy or Irsihangler or someone is infintitely more practical.
 
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