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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering if anybody has information regarding the greased line technique. I am using a LS21509/4 scott 15 ft. with a CND GPS-9/10F. Not sure of leader length flies etc. Does anyone have some information on this style of fly fishing. I am presently skagit style casting. I look forward to your replies. Thanks
 

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Junkyard Spey
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This subject has been discussed here at least once, and maybe twice. A search through the archive will yield some good info.

Also see if you can find a copy of Dry Line Steelhead by Bill McMillan, and a copy of Greased Line Fishing for Salmon and Steelhead by Jock Scott will offer valuable info.
 

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Released to spawn
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Grease lining..

as the name suggests, grease (which is less dense, therefore floats on water) line is floating line fishing, as the ancient silk lines required to be greased before fishing so that they would float. Although the modern floating lines are now intrinsically floating, and don't require greasing, the term is still in common parlance. The Loomis rods have a 'grease line' range.

Floating line fishing, therefore does not use any sink tips, compensators, or any of the 'down & dirty' T8/10/14 etc.

The type of line, ie the belly configuration, however, may be ultra short Skagit style heads, short Scandi heads, mid-Spey belly lengths, and long belly lengths 'GrandSpey' types. All of these types of lines may be used for floating line fishing.

It would appear from this forum and elsewhere, however, that the majority of the North Americans fly fishing bretheren use the Skagit lines in a set-up with 'sinking' tip set-up, with a sinking polyleader, compensator, and/or a length of T8, T10, or T14 (or equivalent fast sink tips), and then short tippet lengths (around or under 6'), and then a light or unweighted fly for Steelies.

True floating line set-ups don't have any sinking tip components, and then use a long (15' or longer) stepped nylon or fluoro tippet down to the fly.

The fly itself maybe 'dry', as in bombers, Wulff's, skulpins, muddlers, and hitched tubes or other waking flies, 'wet' as in Spey & Dee light hooked, lightly dressed flies, right through to coneheads, beadheads, lead-eyed, copper bodied tubes, & brass bottle tube flies.

The depth the 'wet' fly fishes with a floating line depends on the weight of the fly, speed of the drift, angle of initial cast, and the drift or swing itself.

Quite a versatile method, really, and this floating line fishing is especially favoured by many of the European flymen.

Hope this helps out a bit.

Mike
 

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JD
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Grease line fishing

My own rule of thumb is leader length at least as long as the rod. Flourocarbon has a specific gravity greater than water. Therefore, it sinks. For dry fly applications, if you want to use flouro, do so only for the tippet.

Read the two books mentioned.
 

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Hi Darrell,

Grease line fishing is one method of fishing a dry line. Some use the term synonymously with fishing a dry line. Your question is a tough one because there are several interpretations of the technique. If you really want to dive in and study it the two books that MJC list above are good reads and I would also recommend a book by Philip Green titled New Angles On Salmon Fishing. With some time on the water fishing a dry line and having read these 3 books you will be able to put your own interpretation of grease line fishing together.

Keep in mind that part of the confusion in the interpretation is that salmon and steelhead anglers are fishing different water and different speeds. Grease line means different things to steelheaders then it does for salmon fishers.

In some ways reading about grease line fishing seems to mess up new steelheaders. They get it in there head that they need to be constantly mending the line even if the run is perfect to just let the line belly up a bit and pull across and down. One of my favorite rivers is what I would consider perfect grease line water for steelhead and I almost never need to mend.

Good luck on the journey.

Greg
 
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