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Hey just wondering if its an option, was curious what the going rate is for getting a blank wrapped and corked. Was wondering what the rest of the members pay for a custom stick. Is it easier on the wallet or about the same as a stick off the rack?Thanks-N8
 

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First, you should take a look at Bob Meiser's website. He makes beautiful custom rods at very reasonable prices. Second, the price of a custom rod can vary greatly based on the components you pick. The first time I built a rod, it was to save money. After I bought Fuji titanium strippers, Titanium coated snake guides and tip top and a nice reel seat it cost about the same as a finished rod. Granted, it was more upscale and a personal achievement.
 

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One other good option (right across the room from Bob Meiser) is Steve Godshall.

Steve's best known for his custom cut spey lines but he is very-very tallented in rod building. Last three of my rods I had Steve build them for me (ground up) and did a great job. Not a complaint, not one. Beautiful rods and he seems to access 'blanks' (line weights) that I didn't even know existed. One is a full on 2wt trout spey!

Wrapping a rod (guides) is really pretty easy, its the cork handle that's the pain in the butt. There you really do need a lath to turn the rod as you take down the cork. Trying to do same by hand is very-very 'iffy.'

If you'd like Steve's phone number send me a PM.

fae
 

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A significant part of the cost of building a rod is the choice of components, as mentioned. The cost of premium cork, over $3.50 per each flor grade 1/2 inch cork ring calculates to almost $50 for the upper handle on a 13-15 ft. spey rod. A lesser grade cork is cheaper but then you are faced with filling pits and divots in the handle. The reel seat can be very cheap but also very expensive if you want a longer seat to accommodate an older long foot reel or exotic woods for the insert.
That is why we are seeing rods made in Korea etc. are using composites with ground cork and rubber bits glued together.
So you pick your price range and then go shopping for a wide variety of components to match your budget. If you save up for the higher priced components you will be more likely to be happy with the final product appearance wise. Higher priced components will probably not significantly add to the final function of the rod as demonstrated by the Echos, Temple Forks which function well using baseline components and foreign labor.
 
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