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Has anyone used the floating level Cortland line Specialty series as their running line or did I just waste 39.95? On the package it says it is ideal for "chuck and duck style fishing and nymphing." Wait, what???? It is .031" diameter.
Gary
 

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I鈥檝e always though lines specifically advertised for nymphing, especially euro-style nymphing, were kind of hilarious. What are they gonna say, 鈥渢he front 3 feet of our new line are killer鈥? Seems like a wee bit of disdain might have leaked out from the guy writing the box blurb.:)
 

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I think they meant duck and chuck it out the dang window. JK I kid I kid. If its level at .31 it should work fine as a coated running line. Kinda thick IMO but should work fine I guess. I don't use coated running lines anymore tho.
 

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Despite the advertising blurb on the box. that would send any reasonable Spey man (my inner daniel day-lewis lol) running, it Should be fine and very,very comfortable to work with. With the usual a cost of capacity and little less distance.

They aren't my main tool, but i every once in while i enjoy a good fish with a coated runner
 

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Left coasters are not usually into and most are not even aware of the chuck and duck style as used in the GL fisheries.

This approach uses running line with a leader sporting a split shot on a dropper -- often encased in a short piece of paracord crimped at the ends with a swivel on one end -- to shoot casts fairly long distances and bottom bump flies down and across. It is legal and effective and, with pendulum casts, it cuts the need for back cast room.

The floating running line cited above is not necessary in this style of chuck and duck -- intermediate running lines work just as well as you stay in direct contact with deep running flies throughout the cast.

It is far from graceful fly fishing at its best and I'd say its adherents decline as their skills improve.

This product seems directly aimed at the spey casting market where you want to mend running lines and keep them from dragging or tugging under floating lines. To eliminate the 'bumps' in the guides, I'd be tempted to cut off the loops and join the fly line and backing using a piece of braided Cortland backing spliced to both free ends. (See Ard's advice on the matter.)
 

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Interesting. I had never heard of that before, and mostly around here have heard people referring humorously to their bad casting as 鈥渃huck and duck鈥.

Several years ago there was a guy that posted than when he travelled - I think he might even have been a professional trucker - he liked to have one rig set up to quickly do it ALL ready to go in case he passed by some nice water. In that case he said he used his trout line AS the running line when he wanted to use a skagit head which I thought was brilliant.:cool:
 

loco alto!
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Left coasters are not usually into and most are not even aware of the chuck and duck style as used in the GL fisheries.

It is far from graceful fly fishing at its best
I am no fly purist, but this is not fly fishing. Fly fishing uses the weight of the line to cast. So-called 鈥渃huck and duck鈥 fly fishing is drift fishing with a fly rod and a thick running line. Not a dig on the method, either ...
 

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SSpey,

I agree with you on the aesthetics. But the powers that be allow it on Fly Fishing Only waters all over the East.

And, I'd say the same about Euro-Nymphing and mono- lining too where there also is no line casting -- just chunking weighted nymphs on mono. And then there is Tenkara...upscale dapping on a cane rod.
 

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Or is it the fly part that is crucial - exactly when does it become a 鈥渓ure鈥? Sort of makes you empathize with anti-weighted fly, anti-sink tip folks when you think about the slippery slope and how people could creatively exploit any definitional loopholes. And when does a line get short enough to officially cast more like a weight than as a fly line. Very popular for fishing in the Sierra Nevada I have heard, and assume some other places, are water bobbers - bobber/weight hybrids you can fill partially with air and partially with water that allow you to cast and fish tiny nymphs and even streamer flies with a light spinning rod - depending on how to rig/fill the bobber. I guess they are either fantastic adaptations or abominations depending on your point of view. LOL

Tenkara is usually fished very much like traditional fly fishing, with almost no actual dapping techniques involved as far as I鈥檝e ever been aware of. Tiny dry flies - one classic hallmark of 鈥渇ly fishing鈥 are fished a ton this way. And technically the line though often level and minimalist is used for casting (of a sort). I have used a 30鈥 tapered, fureled line on a tenkara rod for certain situations. They cast beautifully. Right up until the fish landing part you can bask in the pure elegance of true fly casting and fishing. Lots (most) of other times they are used like a euro-nymphing system where at least the vestigial parts like the 鈥渇ly line鈥, reel and backing that are mostly totally unused in that context, have been removed. Probably way closer to the Isaac Walton days! So crazy hybrid, or purest of all? :cool:
 

loco alto!
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LOL, guys, it was a simple question about whether the line would work as running line for my two-handers. How did we get all the way to Tenkara? Guess as many of you are stuck on crutches at their computer as I am!
Gary
I鈥檓 stuck reading a draft Master鈥檚 thesis that is making as much sense as calling jigging with shrimp flies and a 16 oz cannonball at 200鈥 depth in the ocean a form of 鈥渇ly fishing鈥. o_O
 
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