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This weekend I did 2 days of shad fishing. Was up to my sternum in the Sacremento river most of the time to reach them, and had my rod and Hardy Salmon #1 submerged a lot. Got to wondering if there is anything other than drying out the cork afterward that people would recommend to take care of it long term. I don't usually wade that deep, but it was nice to be able to dunk the inexpensive ECHO spey rod and the hardy reel without too many worries.

Also getting accidentally sprayed in the face by the H2O roostertail created by the half-submerged Marquis screaming on a long run by a big female ... priceless. :)
 

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Dom
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Years of dipping rods I never had one fail due to being exposed to water even in long periods of time. Cleaning cork is as easy as using soap and a brush. If cork after years of use starts to chip slightly then you can use composite filler sold online specifically designed for this purpose.
 

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David1123

I use U40 cork sealer on all my rods, one application every one to two years. When they become dirty I use hand soap, water and a little bit of baking soda for some grit. It works great and only takes a few minutes.
 

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The main thing in my experience is to never put rods or reels away wet. I have cork grips that are decades old and are still in perfect condition, altho colored, or is that discolored?, from long use.

Sg
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Salmo, that is more or less what I figured. I don't mind the patina at all. I just never really though about the issue much until last weekend where I was so deep, and ended up striping my head out from the tip, which I did virtually every few minutes catching so many fish, with pretty much the whole rod underwater.

I might try the sealant on a few of my cheaper rods just to see how I like it, but I'd assume the cork would already have been sealed in some way on my Meisers and other top end rods.
 

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Yes! Yes!! Yes!!!

The main thing in my experience is to never put rods or reels away wet. I have cork grips that are decades old and are still in perfect condition, altho colored, or is that discolored?, from long use.

Sg
I still use rods that I perched/built when I was in my '20's ... that's a hell of a lot of years back. Wipe them off, let them dry on the kitchen table, wife 1.0 did object, but a freezing garage during the winter does not count. Well, when I got lucky, 'fish slime' really took some effort save for shoving the dog aside.

Another 'wander back.' I really was damned good with a backing pan cakes and eggs. "So how do you like your eggs?"

Saturday afternoon baking: I didn't even many of these kids. :rolleyes: "Small eyes" watching your every move: 'For Desert we have made an English Custard Pudding and Chokolate Cake.' ...

'Next Saturday we will be making 'Hot Cross Buns' served with proper cups of tea. "Dress appropriately."

Best words/worst words in the world: "Mr Evans, May I have seconds?" Worst words were 'Mom and Dad are arguing, can I stay here tonight?'

Yes to both. Night: "It is ok to hug the dog's." Flash light, check on the three: Zonked

fae
 

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David1123

When I got my new Meiser switch rod the first thing I did was treat the cork with U40 cork sealer. This stuff is great!
 

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I suppose the first rule is don't put them away damp (in a closet for instance) and when the handle eventually discolors a washing with mild detergent will help. If they see hard use over the years the cork will eventually dry out and crumble in which case I stick the chunks back on with super glue. At that stage it would be sensible and relatively cheap to replace the handle but that would be taking the easy way out.
 
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