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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm starting to venture into spey flies and I would like your guys opinions on my winging. I've tried various different setting...from aligning the top edges, to running them parallel. Any advice or comments on how they look or ways for me to improve....I'm a novice and would like to improve. I really like the way Brad Burdens' flies look, very streamlined and clean.



 

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Pullin' Thread
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The 1st and 3rd one's wings are fine. If you want the wings on them to cover a little more of the body, just make the wing a few fibers wider so that you can have the wing cover a little more of the sides of the hook eye.

The 2nd one's wing would look better if the black was married to the top edge of the orange (it doesn't appear to be married to the orange in your photo, if I'm mistaken, I appologize) and the black portion should be just a tiny bit longer than the orange. Also, the wing would look better if it were wider and tied in with each side a little lower on the hook eye. The jungle cock cheek looks too long for the hook size and like they are set too low to me. If you use jungle cock on a spey fly, it looks best if it is about 20%-25% of the body length and in line with the hook shank instead of drooping. I jungle cock cheeks are used on a dee fly it would look best if they are about 40%-50% of the body length.

The body veilings is the 1st one would look best if they were tied in at the end of the floss body section and if the floss section was closer to 50% of the body. Doing this would also let the spey hackle be more spread out and sparser looking along with having a better ballanced look to the body. Also, the ribbings on it ought to be speced evenly with one half way between the other. The way to get ribbings to do this is by having them tied in on opposites sides of the fly 180 degrees apart.
 

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Without critiquing the individual flies I can make a small suggestion that will take you a long way. It is best to learn from history prior to departing from it on our own creative endevours. If you can find a copy of Pryce-Tannatt (my personal bible) and learn to tie a Lady Caroline, Purple King, Grey Heron, etc. that is historically accurate, the techniques you will learn can be adapted to anything that strikes your fancy. Shewey's book is also an excellent resource. Once we have mastered that which has gone before, only then we are ready to expand our horizons.
I hope you find these comments helpful, Ramsay
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I sincerely thank you guys for the advice. I'm having so much fun tying spey flies and know that it's going to be an ongoing learning process but it's one that I'm committed to and eager to learn. I'm sure I'll be asking for more help down the road once I get a little more experience. Once again....thanks
 

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Member FRSCA
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For just starting to venture into speys, they look great. Not saying they look like a newbie tied them, they are far better than I would bother to tie for fishing.
 
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