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Discussion Starter #1
I have got numerous new and old lines kicking around and the thought occurred to me that it might be fun to try and make my own shooting head line :D

My initial thought is make a 35' head using a section of floating, intermediate and sinking line. I'm not too worried about how it looks, this is 100% a case of function before form.

Target weight is circa 570 grains. If you know of any articles or have hands on experience I would greatly appreciate your help/advice.

Thanks Paul
 

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Spey line head is easy to cast when rear half of it weights 2/3 of total weight. For 570 gt / 35 ft head rear half of 17'6'' should be 380 gr and front 190 gr. It is best that head weight decrease smoothly so optimum would be ~12' Floating butt which weights 285 gr, ~12' Intermediate middle section 190 gr and ~12' Sinking tip 95 gr.

It would surprise me if your current line material have all those weight/mass ratios I wrote but that's the basic principle. You can change them when you understand what effect rear and front sections make to casting.

Friendly warning! Building fly lines is very addictive and soon you might buy all kinds of out dated lines "just in case"... :D

Esa
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Big thanks

Thanks to both of you, I've placed an order on Poppy's web site lets hope he still has a copy in stock :)
 

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RYI shooting head

If you haven't seen this it could be helpful in construction There are several to watch on youtube this is one of the best. good luck slack https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnyXkEqNgkQ
 

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making shooting heads

Sorry about that link, I guess I dont know how to send one, If you go to youtube and type in welding fly lines I thought this was one of the best when making a head. Good luck slack
 

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Paul,

If you continue the journey and start building your own lines Peter's videos are, IMO the best:

.hooked4life.ca

Have fun, Regards
sixheads
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Good advice

I am lucky enough to know Peter as I have bought, reels and lines from him when his time as the Guideline rep came to an untimely end (bad move Guideline)

I occasionally reach out to him when I'm really stuck on a question and he always manages to help me, without a doubt he is one of lifes better guys :)
 

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+1 on Peter's videos and overall knowledge. Esp when it comes to scandi.
 

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Spey line head is easy to cast when rear half of it weights 2/3 of total weight. For 570 gt / 35 ft head rear half of 17'6'' should be 380 gr and front 190 gr. It is best that head weight decrease smoothly so optimum would be ~12' Floating butt which weights 285 gr, ~12' Intermediate middle section 190 gr and ~12' Sinking tip 95 gr.

It would surprise me if your current line material have all those weight/mass ratios I wrote but that's the basic principle. You can change them when you understand what effect rear and front sections make to casting.

Friendly warning! Building fly lines is very addictive and soon you might buy all kinds of out dated lines "just in case"... :D

Esa
While ca. 8 g/foot ( 95 gr/12') in the front ( 10-12') of the head and the rest of the weight distributing accordingly as you indicated assure easy casting, in order to turnover a larger flies a higher weight/foot in the front is needed.

For example my Guideline triple density F-I-S2 11/12 used on CFB 9135-4 is cut to ca. 585gr/38'. The front 10' wights about 9.5gr/foot and the head cast very well not only on Single Spey ( which handles lines with a bit heavier front better ) but also when using Double Spey.

The extreme case would be an old GL power taper, which had 10-11 gr/foot in the from, had powerful turnover, but where much easier to cast ( relatively speaking) on Single Spey then T-Snap or Double Spey.
 

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the most difficult thing is finding the heavy line and tapers for the butt of the head ... as long as you continually decrease mass... you'll be fine

honestly
there are SOOOO many different commercially available lines on the market, there isn't much need to do homemade-**** outside of the personal satisfaction

don't feel limited by what a line company calls a line on the label
look at the grains/length/profile and match to your application... not their spec sheet
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Personal satisfaction

I am of the "tinkering around" type of person, its my way getting a better understanding of the subject matter and to be honest the season in the UK is almost over so it will give something to do during our winter months.

If I fail and the end product ends up in the trash can its no big deal, I have already learnt quite a bit before I start and if I do get lucky I just might have a couple of unique lines that will do a good job for me.

In my eyes its a win/win scenario and I appreciate all the help and advice offered to me. Thanks Paul
 
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