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Hacker
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602 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

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Registered
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Thanks for the posting. This is important stuff.
They sure dont give you many options in the survey. Its like asking which finger would you want cut off first.
 

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Bob Rodgers
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225 Posts
Comments added. I can only hope that the decision hasn't already been made and the survey is simply theatre.

Please help us try to defeat this ludicrous proposal. You don't have to be an Idaho resident to weigh in.

Adding more stress to a severely stressed fishery is insane.

Bob
 

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Undertaker
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1,333 Posts
You might also wish to send your comments to Allyson Purcell, NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, 1201 NE Lloyd Boulevard, Suite 1100
PORTLAND, OR 97232-1274

Allyson is the branch chief for inland fisheries and recently approved Idaho's fishery plan for steelhead. NMFS has the authority to force IDFG to change its plans and the responsibility to protect and recover the species. You should copy any letter you send to Allyson to IDFG and perhaps the Native Fish Society as well.
 

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Administrator
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This from Swing The Fly...as a reminder regarding the proposed changes and their impact on the Clearwater steelhead fishery. The comment link for IDFG above is quick and simple. This is a link to the article and below is a copy and paste of the text.

http://https://www.swingthefly.com/save-clearwater-c-r-season?fbclid=IwAR0AhXYKGm6JNw98LCuOSlJK7NFh5tA-dblXM0cSpDPpONkDPspBIuNRewg

Proposed Fall Chinook Season Threatens to Destroy Idaho's famed Cleawater River Catch & Release Season
Additionally, zero information has been provided to the angling public about the lack of value of retaining a fall chinook for consumption. By the time the fish reach the mainstem Clearwater River from mid-September to mid-October, their flesh is quickly deteriorating, and the fish are moving quickly onto spawning redds. Not only is the meat of poor quality, a season opens the door to snagging the fish off of their redds, further complicating enforcement for IDFG conservation officers.

A currently proposed fall chinook catch & keep season will destroy the integrity of the catch & release steelhead season by:

-Increasing impacts on already critically threatened Idaho steelhead.
-2017-2018 seasons were two of the worst on record, 2019 forecasts are substantially worse than the previous two.

-Destroy the quiet angling experience of the catch & release season that the river’s anglers value so highly by increasing the amount of large jet boat traffic and associated noise pollution.

This change in angling atmosphere threatens to steer out-of-state anglers who travel specifically to the Clearwater for the catch & release season, and their related economic benefits, to other rivers and regions – outside of Idaho.

IDFG fails to fully understand the economic value the catch and release season brings to the Clearwater region. The opportunity cost of opening a fall chinook season will be a considerable economic loss to the area as anglers will discontinue travelling to fish the famed C&R season – fall chinook, which are not of interest to anglers outside the immediate area, will not make up for this loss.

There are several ways to speak out against the proposed Fall Chinook Season (all of them will take no more than a couple minutes combined!):
Comment deadline is August 23rd!

1. Comment on the NOAA Fall Chinook Fisheries Plan

2. Sign the petition HERE. This will be sent to the Idaho Fish & Game Commissioners.

3. Comment on the official IDFG page HERE:

Swing the Fly is choosing to "Opt out of the ranking" and state "I am strongly opposed to a fall chinook harvest season during the catch & release steelhead season without extending the C&R steelhead season to later in the year, after the fall chinook retention period."

4. Fill out this angling survey about the Clearwater River which helps quantify the economic impact fly anglers bring to the area.





Thank you for your attention and efforts to this matter that will shape the future of the Clearwater River.
 

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Registered
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I have a question. These Kings, by the time they arrive at Clearwater River are they not colored and ready to spawn?

If so why would your dept of fish & game want to have a season for harvest on them?


Money.

And something the fisheries manager can list on his resume as an "accomplishment."

And yes, they are colored, rotting and hit the redds within 1-2 weeks of entering the river.
 

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Dedicated Fisherman
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3,294 Posts
I avoid colored fish but there is no real protection for them here in Alaska. I have caught colored salmon but always by accident, whenever I can actually see them in a channel I move on. Typically the season closes by July 13th by which time most have turned and are getting to the business of spawning. I have seen people hanging around active redds as late in the year as late August and early September torturing spawners just to feel them struggling on the line. Only seen that a couple times and there is / was nothing I can do about it.

Silver salmon are a species that make things difficult for me throughout the fall. Rainbow trout and steelhead trout are most frequently to be found in the area of the silvers and their spawning activity. It takes accurate casting - good line & fly control as well as good eyesight in order to avoid having an angry male salmon stuck to your fly every other cast. Like the kings there are no laws to stop people targeting the spawners but after they color up fishing pressure fades greatly. The silvers will be present in some rivers right into November so you learn how to avoid them.

The idea that your state would actively endorse the idea of targeting fish which are ready to produce the future of their species is hard to understand. I wish you well in the fight to protect what you have down there.

Ard
 
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