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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the best way to color a flyline? I have some sinktips I made that have a portion of floating line spliced in. I want to color it so that the bright line isn't so close to my fly when swinging. I tried permanent marker and it worked ok, but is kinda coming off. Any suggestions? Is there a better way? Thanks

Brian
 

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Dying lines

One good and easy way to do it is with Rit dyes you can buy at supermarkets.

Put dye in something like an old coffee can (dye will stain kitchen pots) and
add boiling water to dissolve dye
Let dye bath cool to lukewarm
Put line in and check to see when it has become a little darker than you
want (it will lose some color in the rinse)
Remove line and rinse in cool water.
Let dry

Takes about 20 min.
 

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Jack Cook
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Yes

I have used dyes, I do a lot of dyeing here at the shop, and dyes work just fine on fly lines. In fact Kool Aid makes a great dye. A little expensive but the same proteins as big boy dye.

That said I prefer the tea. It knocks the line down to a nice natural look, has no environmental effects, and I can even have a cup to drink while the line is processing.
 

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One thing I have found when dyeing lines is to be sure to clean them thoroughly before starting. The first time I tried, I omitted to do this, and the dye didn't take at all well - presumably because there was either grease or a water-repellent dressing which impeded the takeup. Second time round I gave it a really good rub with liquid soap (not detergent, which I'm told can have adverse effects on plastics) and the dye took immediately. Just give it a wipe over with whatever line dressing you favour afterwards, and it should be fine.
 

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Do a test ....

Do a test ...
I have dye lines and to make sure you get close to the color you want ... use a piece of the same line and dip the whole piece in the dye ... then after a time put out part of the line ... then wait some more them pull out some more ... etc ... rinse the line and check the colors ... then pick the color and time you want ... that way you will be close to the color you want ... and not get a big surprise at the end. Good luck.
 

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Dye

If you use the Rit dye. 2 heaping tablespoons of salt will improve the dying. I use a large cool whip tub, I read somehere not to use a metal container. I have dyed several lines without a problem. Note you can not dye a dark line a lighter color.

Skilly
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
tried the tea, but....

I tried the tea, but it didn't seem to make the line much darker. One line is green and the other is orange. These colors should be able to be dyed gray, brown of black, right? I just want to darken them up so that the fly isn't close to such a bright line as it swings thru the water. I may try the rit dye next and see what happens. Thanks for all the info everyone.

Brian
 

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dye

Brown or black should work fine. I dyed one orange XLT red from the end of the head to the back of the line and another dark purple. Both have faded some after a years use, but it is still easy to tell the difference.
 

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Downer
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Why do you dye your line?
 

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Dyed lines

I haven't done it for steelhead fishing, but for trout fishing in clear spring creeks, a bright or light colored line flashing in the air will often put them down. Also, if you fish New Zealand, the guides all but insist that you dye your lines dark colors before going over. In the case of trout fishing, it's not the color of the line in or on the water, but the flash and motion of the line in the air that seems to spook the fish.
 
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