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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys: Last September I posted a question about , for lack of a better desription, tailing loops:

http://www.speypages.com/speyclave/showthread.php?t=20948

Yesterday, I watched the trailer for Simon's new DVD and there is was. The Collision Loop. What causes the Collision Loop and why do you think I started getting one when working the slow deeper part of a run?

Thanks for your help.

Mark
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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Hi Mark -

Most commonly it's caused by the casting stroke being out of plane with the d-loop.

My guess for why you probably started to get it when in a deep part of the pool is that you started to place the d-loop upriver more parrallel to the shore - maybe due to rocks, lack of backcasting room or inability to wade out from shore because of depth.

Then when the forward cast was made it tried to go out toward the middle of the river, which is not in the same plane as the d-loop. If the angle between the d-loop and the casting stroke is less than 180 degrees the loop will likely collide with itself.

Have to see it to know for sure but that would be my first guess.
 

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JD
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Tailing loops

I have always been told that the cacuse of tailing loops was too much power applied eary in the stroke. This causes the rod tip to collapse. And as we all know the line follows the path of the rod tip.

I have found this happens now and then when I get in deeper water. It seems to be kind of a phychological thing that makes me want to overpower every aspect of the cast. I have to either really concentrate to overcocme the urge,,,,or back out of the water a little.:tsk_tsk:
 

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Collision loop

Hi Mark
Tailing loops are caused when the rod tip travels in a concave path. There are a number of reasons for this, some of these are, poor application of power (often because of creeping prior to the forward stroke) Unloading the rod to soon on the forward stroke, also to much line outside the rod tip for the casing stroke. A friend of mine Dr. Gordon Hill has a list of about 14 reason's why we tail when casting with a single hand. If it's a line collision problem your having, Juro's answer is right on. You need to follow the 180.
Hope this helps.
Rick Whorwood
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Guys

All the water around here is solid. Once it warms up enough to find a place to cast, I am going to put your suggestions to work.

Thanks Again.
 

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Methinks Juro is as is often the case- right on:)- try aiming your casting stroke a little "inside " the anchor point , versus over the anchor point.

Will
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My anchor was slightly upstream of my right hand shoulder doing a right hand single spey, so I think is was OK. Nothing behind me-good single handed water. I'm guessing that it has to be my loop. Thanks for the advice.
 

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I could be wrong, but I am pretty sure you can cause that collision any time you try to cast over line lying in the water.

I have mastered most of the bad casts!
 

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Mark
I used to do this a lot when I was casting a fast Euro-action (sage 9141) rod. I couldn't feel the rod load and so was never really sure how long to form my d-loop behind me. As a result I'd overcompensate on the forward stroke, and overpower the cast (as Juro said) and then watch the dreaded collision.

I agree with JD, its a psychological thing too when you get to bigger, deeper water. That's usually when the wheels come off for me :mad:
dan'l
 

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fly on little wing
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Hi Mark

Unfortunately this happens to me too. Like yesterday! The good news is that I know I'm going out of plane like Juro mentions. I had a deep sunk tip (type 8) and I try to bring it up into a snake roll without first roll casting to bring it up. I don't want to roll it up and smack the water because I get hits on the dangle in this area.

Gary
 

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Mark,

Also, were you casting a sinking fly? If so, the fly may have been too far under the water surface. Therefore, there was too much water tension when you executed the forward cast. As the result, the fly lagged and you got a bad tailing loop.

If this is the case, try bringing the fly closer to the surface by using a mini roll cast or a snake roll before you begin the back swing.

Randy
 

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JD
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Agree with Whiskey Dick

But others have not.

Randy
I would suggest those currently having problems of similar nature, post their own thread. What are we doing here? Keeping an open log of every problem and suggested solution since time began? :Eyecrazy:
 
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