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Hi All,
I am preparing a cold weather clothing article for my field people (cemetery workers in the Dept of Veterans Affairs, National Cemeteries). My biggest concerns are those in the north/northwest. The articles I used are from Army field manuals. I never realized how easy I had it on the Air Force. I read a recent article in American Angler, which basically was an ad for high priced products, but gave trade names not materials. If you steelhead in nasty weather (dumb statement) the article is important. It gives materials that can be found economically (Army surplus, closeouts). I'm still editing it to make it look pretty, but the data is important. I hope the file attached correctly.
Regards
Don
 

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I just got a PM that provided the following site by the US Antarctic Program on cold weather clothing.
Don

quest.arc.nasa.gov/antarctica/background/NSF/field-guide/manual1.html
 

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Others may correct me, but any reference to cotton, even just as a layering material, should be redacted. Cotton absorbs moisture and loses most of its insulating characteristics when wet or damp. I don't think you will find many cold-weather fishermen wearing anything made of cotton if they can help it. My $0.02.
 

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Cotton

fishnet, works surprising well, but with the modern synthetics, there is absolutely no reason to go that route. Polypro is the minimum. Its biggest problem, in my experience, that a couple of days in waders leaves it smelling pretty high.
 

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I would have to agree with Smolt. I do at least 1 12-14 day wilderness trip a year, usually in Sept/Oct. I got rid of my last cotton piece (underwear) 5 or 6 years ago. With all the hi-tech (poly for the most part) fabrics out there, there is no reason to use cotton. Gets wet, stays wet, then gets STINKY! :chuckle:
 
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