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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I have heard that spey rods are not suited very well for coho fishing. Is that true and what can the reasons be?
I´m thinking about buying a light spey like the Loop 7116. Do you think such a light line rod is enough rod for strong coho and steelhead (Skeena and tributaries)?
Thanks.
Stefan:confused:
 

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JD
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Coho

As I understand it, Coho favor a jigging action, where the fly is weighted with dumb bell eyes and is stripped back in. Spey rods are not as well suited to stripping retrieves as are single hand rods.
 

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Stefan,

JD is right in that coho prefer a stripped retrieve of the fly, however, the common belief that doublehanded rods are not good for coho comes from the bias of long-belly speycasters. The strength of long-belly lines is the ability to pick up and present the next cast without stripping any line - the problem for coho fishing is elementary - no strip retrieve - no coho!

This problem does not preclude the use of double-handers for coho, rather just the use of long-belly lines. If you use a short head system like the Loop Adapted lines, or even a Windcutter type short-belly line you will have no trouble catching coho.

This past summer I went to Cape Cod to fish for stripers with Juro. I successfully used a Loop Green 13' rod even though the fishing requires stripping the line back to the beach - as I used a Loop shooting head - it was a great system. So if you want to get a double-handed rod to do double duty for Skeena steelies and coho you will be fine.

Now, as for the 7116. I'm not so sure you want to go that light! If you are only going to fish the Morice you'd be fine, but the Bulkley, Kispiox, Skeena, et al - I think you might want to step up a little bit. Not only are the steelhead a fair size - so are those coho!
 

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Stefan S

Your average 7 weight rod is probably to light for most mere mortals connected to a hot coho.

Two years ago on the mouth of the Rogue, I hooked into a fresh coho with my 7136. There was nothing that I could do to stop or turn the fish.

Fortunately before I lost my line and backing, a seal took care of the problem.

This September, I will be trying again with my 7141 and 10151 if the 7141 is too light. Last year while fishing for some hot and deep half pounders on the lower Rogue with my 7141, I had a coho hit. The 7141 was able to turn and bring it in. It broke a 6 pound tippet up close as I was trying to back it out of the river.

As Juro, noted the 7141 is multi personality rod.
 

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Pullin' Thread
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I fish for coho each fall on the Skagit, Nooksack, Skykomish, Sol Duc, Bogachiel. Elwha, and Cascade Rivers with my 13 ft 8/9 GLX. This is the only time I use a Windcutter line (an 8/9/10) anymore. And I use it for precisely the reasons that Kush listed. It is just a easy to use a 2-hander for coho as it is to use a single-hand rod.
 

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flytyer. Kush

When you use your Windcutters to fish for coho, do you use all of the tips or do you take tip two off the line?
 

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Grampa Spey,

I don't fish much for coho anymore ( just too busy chasing big fall run steelhead :smokin:) but since coho tend to like slack water I used to rely on the "Slime Line " or similar clear intermediate lines. If I were to go out with a 2-hander for coho now I would definitely use the full range of tips - intermediate through type VIII.

Just in case I misunderstood your question - if you are referring to cutting back on the Windcutter so as to be able to use tips - then the answer is a definite yes. To turn real tips over you need to remove the front taper. How much for a Windcutter? Somebody else will have to chime in as I have never cut one - but I know you need to.

If you are fishing slacker water then you might consider using he various poly-leaders out there - in which case you would not have to cut back your taper. Just tie a short Perfection or Double Surgeon loop on the tip of your flyline and loop to loop connect the poly-leader!
 

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How many tips??

Just a quick point of clarification. Kush (and others) are probably suggesting only removing tip 1 (the first 15') for Coho.

Removing tip 2 (leaving 20' or so of running line) usually only occurs when fishing Big Boy (24') tips in really deep water.

I do a bit of fishing for Coho and find that the regular Windcutter with a type 3 or 4 tip is sufficient. Of course, I'm used metal "eyes" on my flies to get that up-and-down action that seems to drive Coho crazy, my fly is also sinking quickly.

Also, as Kush mentioned, Coho often hang out in slack water pools where you don't need 24' of Deep Water Express to get down to them.

My .02,

DS
 

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OOPS!

I ~meant~ to say only 20' of floating belly, not 20' of running line.

Guess that's why they have the Preview feature! :eek: :hehe:
 

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Pullin' Thread
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As Doublespey and Kush siad so well, it is only the first 15 ft (tip 1 of the multi-tip Windcutter) that you remove. I use all of my tips from type 3 to type 8 for coho. It depends on how deep the water is, and how fast I have to retrive the fly that derermines the sink tip used.

Unlike Doublespey, I don't use metal eyes to get the jigging effect, I use stainless steel bead chain in either medium or small to get the jigging. This means that my sink tip is relied upon to get the fly down to the fishes level.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
7116 too light

Thanks for your help.
Think a spey rod is a good choice, but the 7116 is a little bit too light. I think I´ll look for a little bit heavier like a Blue or Yellow Line 8124 or 9132.
Stefan:)
 
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