Spey Pages banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, just received my Steelhead Specialist today, excuse me for being a newb but when connecting the sections together, are you suppose to connect them til you cannot see the graphite underneath? In other words, til both sides of paint meet and touch at the dots?
I found it super hard to get them to go all the way, what is the easiest way to slide them together without needing pliers to get them apart later, is there a lubricant or just use siliva?
Sorry for the newb questions, but I'm use the the "standand" type of connecting rods; sage,GLX,etc. I can't wait to get this gem on the river!

Thanks for all your help guys!

PS: What are your opinions on the Steelhead Specialist? Should I of saved my money and waited for the newer "specialist" models that are coming out in mid Sept? Thanks again!

Peter ><>
 

·
loco alto!
Joined
·
3,109 Posts
Spigot ferrules are different, and are not meant to go "all the way" together. Just push the sections together until snug, then tape
 

·
Here we go again!
Joined
·
620 Posts
Put the sections together only until they are snug and then tape them. Do a search for "Tape" using the search function here on the board. The sections have to be taped to keep them from coming apart due to the torque put upon them by the spey casts. See Dana's video clips on this at speypages.com.

If you have succesfully pressed the sections together "until the colors meet" as you say, you have succesfully destroyed the rod as you undoubtedly have stressed and fractured the female ferrule. If you put the pliers to her to get it apart this should finish the destruction process. Spigot ferrules are made to stop when the taper of the male ferrule meets the diameter of the female end. They are not to be forced.

Here's hoping you haven't gone that far yet! :frown:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Moose

Not to make fun of someones' possible misfortune but Moose's response gave me quite a chuckle. Thks moose. That must have taken some force to get the colours to meet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wooow. I've never heard of "taping" sections, let alone on the correct way its done. It must be hell taking the tape off after a tiring day of fishing.
The reason for tape sounds logical, but man theres gotta be an easier and FASTER way to safely secure sections on a spey.
Would you also recommend taping 4pc rods that do not have this type of connection, ie; XP,GLX,etc. ? Thanks for all the help!

><>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
CND rod section connecting

Peter
Taping a rod, is good insurance.
Also it is a good practise to use wax on the male ferrules, candle wax will work just fine, a couple of light strokes is all that is needed. If you choose not to tape, make sure you check your rod ferrules often during the day. Taping a single hand rod is not a bad idea, especially if your casting heavy sunk lines all day. A little tip is when taping, get in the practise of starting below the ferrule spirral up past the joint then back down to where you started (this makes it easier to find) , fold just a very small bit of a corner, of the tape, this makes it some what easier also (especially if you have no nails).

I bought a neat product from G.Loomis awhile back, "Rod Wrap's", these are velco type straps that can be used to keep your rod section's together when not in use, these are especially good if you do a lot of hiking when you go fishing. Hope this helps.
Rick Whorwood
G.Loomis Pro-Staff
 

·
Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
Peter -

I hope you did not succeed in pushing them together all the way; just push them together at a 45 degree angle and twist/push them until tight - that's it.

Unlike single hand rods that are used in a linear back and forth motion, the spey cast creates a lot of torsion (twist) in the rod and the ferrules are not going to stay together forever regardless of the brand or design of the rod.

All two-handed rods will work their way loose over (n) casts and these joints are affected by things like temperature changes, moisture, type of line, casting style, etc. Once ferrules work their way loose, a single cast can fracture the structure of the rod.

I would avoid candle wax, this can contain fragrances, dyes, and other agents. Use pure 100% parrafin wax, and tape any ferrules you can not check regularly while spey casting. If you tape well you really don't need to wax.

This is not an unusual practice, in fact you will see discussions of taping in spey videos made by the masters emphasizing the importance.

If you have any questions of this type feel free to contact me at [email protected] or ask your CND dealer.

good fishing,
Juro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
947 Posts
Dana and Juro,

The instructions shown on Dana's tapes seem fine for the wider sections of the rod, but what about the connection nearest the tip? Do you spiral the tape up AND down the rod there too, or in just one direction?

Thanks,

CK
 

·
Damn fish ladder
Joined
·
199 Posts
Yeah But...

A gutsy spey rod company could make a simple and effective positive locking system and we could be done with this taping business.

Alternative #2- make ferrules that fit with a friction fit (a la metal cane rod ferrules) instead of a fit by diametral taper.
 

·
Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
Brooklynangler -

I appreciate your own 'gutsiness' but we're talking centuries of rod building here. Maybe we ought to have a design contest right here on the site! :cool:
 

·
Junkyard Spey
Joined
·
7,114 Posts
Taping...

Brooklynangler when you sell somebody a cane rod don't you tell them "don't put it away in a wet bag, don't transport it when it's not cased, ect? Taping is no different. Just precautions you have to take with a certain type of rod. Most cane rod makers are talented, inventive guys so why don't you design this magic ferrule. You will then be able to sell it to all the rod companies and be rich beyond your wildest dreams. Spending your remaining days idly casting on your private beat of your favorite river.
I really don't see what the big deal is. You are only talking about 3 or 4 minutes going on or coming off. Watch Derek on his video. He is done in no time and he never misses a beat in that heavy brogue. I will tell you that you can tape your ferrules a lot of times in the time frame of sending a broken rod in for a repair.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,042 Posts
Peter,

A couple of things. Taping is a bit of a pain, but I do it religiously - I view it as cheap insurance! To make removing it at the end of the day easier I do two things. First I always tape the same way, I start at the bottom of the ferrule, spiral up, then back down - this way I always know that the tag end is at the bottom of the ferrule when I'm looking to take it off. Secondly, I make sure I overlap the last wrap, that is I make sure the tag extends onto the bare blank - where it is easy to see and grip. If you stop the wrap on the tape-wrapped part of the rod it is tough to find - especially in poor light.

As for the Steelhead Specialist - you will love it. The new CND Solstices are different rods from yours, none of which are designed to do what your rod will do. The Solstices are designed for summer-type fishing while they will certainly handle tips - they shine for floating line work. The Steelhead Specialist on the other hand is one of the ultimate all-round steelhead rods. Very few other rods can handle the variety and range of lines that this one takes in stride. As a newbie your casting style has not yet yet developed, no matter what your personal casting style evloves into the Steelhead Specialist will be an excellent tool. Enjoy.
 

·
Steelhead are cool!
Joined
·
572 Posts
Peter,

I would suggest you contact speybum(Aaron) at river run if you have not
already. There is alot you could learn in a short period of time with good
instruction. I hope you didn't use pliers on that new rod. Ouch!
Saliva is not a good ferrule lube. Use candle wax as mentioned before.
If you don't use tape check your sections every half hour or so.

Kevin
 

·
a/k/a loophitech
Joined
·
457 Posts
Taping

I'll second the taping. I had a Surf Tamer that broke on the top spiggot ferrule due to not checking the connection. I "thought" I had a good connection and after throwing line for 1/2 an hour the tip top slipped and broke off a small piece of the spiggot on a backcast. I learned to tape after that!!

Vinnie
 

·
Damn fish ladder
Joined
·
199 Posts
Zee magic ferrule

The magic ferrule has already been designed and used- the twist-lock ferrule on older british cane spey rods.

While these weren't always the best designs, individually, they were, the best designs overall for the problem- the need for a strong joint that inhibits flexion in a predictable manner AND prohibits rod torque to misalign the sections.

The problem with this and friction fit metal ferrules is that the fitting of the male ferrule to female ferrule (tolerance of less that 1/10000 of an inch) is not something that can be automated and process-engineered into being a no-brainer. So, these are out.

Since diametral taper ferrules are the only game in town and since a great deal of time and money has gone into their integration in every rod model in every maker's line...this ain't gonna change.
---
MY DESIGN--

I have a very effective, sound design that I've developed over the last 6 months of tinkering. I'm working it up in a form that can be patented. I will be approaching tackle makers (of all kinds) once I have the appropriate protections applied for.

Joe
 

·
Damn fish ladder
Joined
·
199 Posts
To Mjc

I definitely hear your intent regarding cane rods...BUT

I can't engineer wetness out, I can't MAKE guys keep my 50hrs of work in a tube, but I CAN engineer the ferrules (if I was a company that made tubular composite rods.)

As I use metal ferrules (and will on my cane spey rods: a 6 wt, 7 wt, and 9/10 wt, which are still in the "making" phase- between hours spent studying for law school), the need for a locking design is not crucial. The fit is a friction fit over more than an inch in the 22-26/64ths ferrules they use. You'd break the rod before you'd misalign it.

Again, though, these kinds of ferrules are not right for tubular graphite nor for the present economies of produciton rodmaking.

When I've made my $30 from my groundbreaking locking ferrule design, I promise to send a case of beer to the forum ;)

Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,297 Posts
yes

i use a pipe wrench to secure the pieces, :devil: ,,if you take reel good care of the sections=cleanliness,DO NOT put the sections together if you feel any grit WHATSOEVER,,pay attention to the `wear patterns' on the ferrules,,,after all you ARE breaking in the pieces,,,snug periodically especially if doing,fully loaded,or `change of direction' casts,,,the twisting thang again,,,you can fish without wax/tape,i love spigots, they are heavier,,but,an old car guy like me can look at the wear and SEE what's going on during flexing,i had a bad trip with wax,,dirt.it loves to stick to wax,even dog hair,,,build a little ramrod out of fairly small wire,make a loop,,use whatever,,toilet paper works great ,to clean out the sections,if you EVER see any marks on the male section,looks like a `worm' mark on an old piece of driftwood i guess???for lack of a better description,a single grain of sand will do this,stop!,clean the pieces,,grab the pipe wrench,a cold one :razz:eek:r just do what the manufaturer says!,like you're supposta', :hihi:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
If you tape well you really don't need to wax.

I have to disagree. I make it a habit of waxing before I put my rod away. If you have ever been through a bout with trying to get a stuck ferrule off you know what I mean. Sage rods are famous for this and need to be waxed regularly.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top