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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, greetings from Wyoming-
I'm new to this whole speycasting technique, but excited to try- I'm interested in getting a rod for lake fishing for trout, but hav'nt a clue about anything yet- Have a chance to pick up a 12'6" 6wt rod -I fish all 6wts, but don't know if it applys to speycasting for this application... Wondered if anyone could tell me if this would apply to what I'm looking for- Many of the lakes are high banked so I think this could be good- The wind blows here a bit , too
Thanks alot for any help-
Uflyfish2
 

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Everybody and their brother has a different take on this, so here is mine, and while it is not necessarily the one to listen to, I have a few reasons for my opinions. Oh, FYI I am fishing western streams and lakes for trout about 100 days a year so I am familier with the conditions and places you might be fishing. Hopefully I can be a help.

A 6 wt spey rod will not cast a standard 6 wt line. Most Spey rods are designed to load with 60-70 feet of line out, so the standard short head of a 6 wt WF will not be enough grains to cast most 6 wt spey rods and the switch side of that is that a 6 wt spey line will be much to heavy for a 6 wt singlehanded rod. So if you do purchase this rod, you will need to invest in a line and probably a larger reel, not only to house the fat spey line, but to balance the longer and heavier rod.

Now this is just my opinion, so don't hold it in stone and you are welcome to disagree, but a spey rod is not an ideal tool for fishing trout in lake for many reasons. I will try to list them.
1. The spey line, being much heavier than a standard WF is not nearly as delicate in a given size and this can spook fish. Also, spey casts tend to disturb the water around the angler much more than single handed rods.
2. Spey casting is a great way (no, the best!) to fish a set length of line. It is a lousy way to fish a widely varible length of line, such as you would have in a cast and retrieve fishing a lake. It is a lot of work to get the belly of the line back out of the rod's guides so you can recast after each presentation.
3. Spey casts can be made on still water, but work best on moving water.
4. I personally find it is easier to throw a tight and powerful loop with a singlehanded rod and a double haul than a two hander and no haul. Now keep in mind I am a much much better single hand caster than spey caster, but for fishing in a big wind, it is easier (for me!) to fish a single handed rod. Maybe once my spey skills improve, this will not be the case, but it will be the case for you in all probability until you become better with the long rod.

I am sure there are a few others, but that should make my point. Now, a long single handed rod can be a big advantage on western lakes. A 10 foot 6 wt or maybe one of Bob Meiser's switch rods would allow you great roll casting range, still allow you to double haul, provide excellent lifting and line control capabilities and not be to tiring to fish. This could be a better solution to your high bank locations.

Now, these are the reasons you should buy the Spey rod any way :)
1. You want a new toy!
2. It will give you something new and challenging to learn.
3. You will find great uses for it on the Bighorn, swinging streamers and maybe high stick nymphing.
4. Spey fishing for trout is a lot of fun.
5. You might find that it is the world's best lake rod and I am completely wrong:hehe:

Good luck. Sorry this is so long, I get a little carried away!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Dr. Swing, thanks a ton for the great reply! Very informative!
I have had very similar advice from The Deschutes Angler fly shop- ( Seem like very nice folks) . They too said it wasn't the best application for lakes- We must also think alike, for I recently picked up a 10' 6wt. RPL- I think I'll still figure out a way to convince myself to get a spey rod in the future... Thanks again-
Uflyfish2
 

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IMHO,

A 6 wt 2-hander would be an ideal lake rod. The 6 wt 2-handers are trout wt, rods that will let you fish any trout fly and will allow you to toss the bugs 70+ feet out into the lake with minimal effort. Yes, you will have to buy a 5/6 short-belly spey line (Windcutter spey type) and a reel a bit larger than for a standard WF6 line (a reel that would work for an 8or 9 wt line loaded with 20# backing would work perfectly for a 5/6 WindCutter).

However, a light 2-hander will let you make those 70+ ft casts to were the fisheys are when you have the high bank right behind you, your 10 ft single-hander will not.

During the 12 years I spent living in Montana, I found many places on high lakes, lower elevation lakes, and rivers where a light line 2-hander would have been perfect. Alas, as that time ('79 to '91) there were no 6 wt 2-handers on the market in the U.S. or I would have bought one. The 12' to 12'6" 6 wt rods will also provide more distance when fishing from a float tube. There are several very good 6 wt 2-handers on the market and with actions from slow to medium to fast you should be able to find one that is just right for you. CND, T&T, Sage, G Loomis, and Bob Meiser all offer them. A good starting point would be to drop Bob Meiser and Juro and Private Message with more info such as type of action you like, how much you want to spend, etc. and get thier inputs.

Kush, (one of our moderators and regular contributors) uses a 6 wt 2-hander for lake fishing in B.C. and very much likes doing so.
 

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I am glad to hear a few differing opinions on this. My own attempts to cast a two hander out of a float tube have been very comical though. Both Flytier and Kush are FAR better spey casters than I am. If I had their bad ass skills, maybe I could find the 2 hander more useful on lakes. But I still don't see it as an ideal tool for a strip retrieve presentation, though I may not have explored the possibilities as fully as I should have.

These are a few things I have been considering:

If injury limits your ability to cast a single hander, a two hander can be a saving grace, as it was for Kush.

A beginer caster can probably achieve greater distance with a two hander than a single hander, until the double haul is learned. If you want a distance short cut, instead of learing to haul correctly, a two hander can help.

If you only wanted to fish a fly from 70-30 feet out, not fully retrieve the fly close to you position, and cared little if you disturbed the water around you, a two hander might be ideal.

Now with that said, I still stick to my guns and say the two hander isn't the ideal tool, but I will give you that it will have some uses.

Oh, backpacking a two hander up to an alpine lake is not my idea of fun. Even the 4 pc rods have huge cases compared to a 9 footer. Just thought I would add that.

I may throw the spey rod in the boat next summer when I take beginers out on Hebgan lake. For me, it isn't the ideal fishing tool, but it may help them get the Chironomids away from the boat. Thanks for the thought provoking debate!

:)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
MJC and Flytyer- Thanks alot for the helpfull info!
Can you cast the shortbelly spey line overhead, or must you speycast it??
 

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You can overhead a short belly line pretty easily. Overhead casts require a slightly lighter line to fully load the rod than spey casts. Many manufacturers have A (light load) B (heavy load) ratings for their lines. Often it is easier to overhead the A rated line, though keeping more of the B rated line in the guides works fine if you want a heavier load on the rod to learn how to speycast. Hope that makes sense.
 

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Overhead casting a short-belly spey line is very easy. Just use the same line size you use for spey casting. A new spey caster should begin by using the heavier B line RIO rating to load the rod more easily until he develops his technique.
 

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Uflyfish2

Contact Bob Meiser and talk to him about his 5/6 weight 10'6" Switch Rod. I have one and it is my favorite medium weight rod, that I have ever owned.

It will handle any 6 weight line you currently own. You can fish with it from a float tube, a canoe, a pontoon boat or _________ or from the shore with trees right up to your back.

Then, buy a Rio 5/6 Windcutter floating line to spey cast and switch cast with it or to nymph a stream or dry fly fish a seam 50 to 70 feet from you in a river. You can lob cast an indicator and a couple of weighted flies upstream 50 to 60 feet and have control of the line down to you and then down stream for 50 to 60 feet and repeat the process with another lob cast upstream or across stream.

This rod works well with half pounder steelhead, small summer steelhead, trout, cuts, large mouth and small mouth bass.

This rod will be my main fresh water rod from Spring until early fall. My back up rod will be my Sage 7136 when I need a little more distance with my floating MS 6/7 and a dry fly or hackle type of fly.
 
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