Spey Pages banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Mike was kind enough to send me a sample pack of daiichi circle hooks with a recent order. I tied up a few flies with them and as luck would have it I touched a steellie today.

I had a strike a few minutes prior to this fish and of course my set-the-hook-now-reflex kicked in and I lost that one. So, for the next several casts I kept mumbling to myself..."don't set the hook...don't set the hook".

Then, strike! I slowly lifted my rod and made sure I had good contact and allowed the fish to hook itself. Darned if it didn't. A couple quick jumps, a small run, and then the fish worked itself just below me, I got a good look. At this point my rod tip was more 'above' this fish that to the side. And the fly popped out. :(

So, should I have kept my tip low and to the side if these hooks are designed to catch them in the lip? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
imho down and to the side is always the way to go when the fish is downriver from the angler. anything to keep the fly going into the fish as opposed to out of it's mouth. if you just imagine the physics of this i think you will see the benefit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
When i've used circle hooks with conventional tackle i've been told to always apply side pressure to keep it in the corner of their mouth and to keep them off balance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Side Pressure

You need to keep side pressure on fish that are downstream. This is particularly true with spey rods. If you keep the rod high you're lifting the fish and putting force on the hook that doesn't keep it locked in the corner of the mouth.

Gordon
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top