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I am two years new to spey casting and do not understand the noise that is generated by some casts and casters. I want to approach the river as softly and gently as I can. When I hear the water slapping cannon fire of a heavy line anchor or the whipping of a rod from a mile away I cringe. How do you feel about the noise that you make and how bystanders or other fishermen perceive your casting and impact their experience on the river? Does spey casting have to be loud to be effective? Maybe I am a little self conscious and should not care what others think but want to fish quiet. Thanks, SR
 

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Junkyard Spey
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If I remember right Derek Brown says if you hear the line ripping off the water "it's no good a tall" or something like that. For my own personal 2 cents I think we have more to worry about then some poor devil trying to learn to spey cast and how much noise his line makes leaving the water. Maybe I'm immune as my hearing is about 95% gone. Take care, MJC

Addendum to the above. SR, I may have misread your question. If you are talking about the noise you are making then I agree with Fred about to much line stick. Some instruction from a better caster, a good video, and more practice should solve the problem. Your welcome to come over and fish next to me. I fish in a riffle next to a busy highway and like I said I can't hear. Take care, MJC
 

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Spinyray, I think you make a good point. While I believe that noise above water doesn't matter, surface disturbance certainly does, and speycasting is always going to make more water disturbance than overhead casting. With a good single spey cast this should be minimal, and will be upstream of the fisherman and hence away from the fish. But the double spey in particular causes significantwater disturbance, and moreover this is downstream and hence nearer the fish. Loop instructor Eoin Fairgrieve says of the double spey: 'It does however, have one disadvantage. From a fishing point of view, when the rod sweeps back downstream to lift into the 'D' Loop, the line cuts through the water with a ripping effect. This is often referred to as the 'white mouse' and at times, must surely startle fish.'

In fast, ripply water I suspect that the disturbance from speycasting gets lost among the general water noise. But if, like me, your fishing sometimes takes you to slow, glassy pools, I'd be inclined to cast overhead. Incidentally, another advantage of the overhead cast is that a rod can be made to work work with a much lighter line, which would be difficult or impossible to speycast. One of the best fishermen I know only uses one double-handed rod all season; a 15' rated for a #10 line. In low water conditions, where stealth is important, he uses it with a #6DT line, although he can only cast overhead with it. Falkus acknowledged the problem of water disturbance, and admitted that 'In low water conditions on some pools a case can be made for using an overhead cast'.
 

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I have often found that overhead casters disturb the water and fish much less than speycasters, this is as they spend most of their time climbing trees trying to retreive their flies instead of fishing.

Take casting lessons, then practice. Then the noise and disturbance is very little. If you are casting 40 yds the disturbance beside you either, upstream or downstream is hardly a problem. If casting 10 yds then the anchor hardly has a huge grip sound this tearing sound is much smaller.

Go fish and stop worrying
 

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.02 cents here only but if you're 'ripping' a lot

of line off the water with your cast you've probably got waaay too large an anchor (leader plus a chunk of line). Several casts (snake, Steve Choate's 'single spir., etc.,) only have leader contact with the water (and even that's just for a portion of a second) when you come back to form your 'd,' or even better yet 'v,' loop.

Try checking out where your 'achor' is setting on your casts and watch to see if this includes a chunk of line.

fae
 

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My .02

I agree with you guys, but I haven't found a good way to make the Snap T/C or Circle spey quiet. If your using a type 6 or 8 head with a heavy fly, you really have to pull that line out of the water to form a nice D loop to make a nice cast. I'm usually throwing it out far enough where I don't think the noise makes a difference.

-Doug
 

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Doug, with the circle or the Perry Poke noise

will be a factor. But the circle cast places the line very close to and parallel to the beach so don't think it (noise) would be a significant factor ... other than very low/clear water.

The 'Poke' being laid out 'mid stream' could be an issue as a lot of line gets moved from A to B to C in the cast. But if you're 'jerking tips' about, the price you have to pay? Actually, Steve C's Single Sp. will really move a type III airbone with minimal "crash and bang.''
fae
 

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Spey and Noise

A lot of overhead two-handers use a water haul in our area. That makes more disturbance than "good" spey casting and I emphasize good. If you are doing it right, there shouldn't be a lot of noise, with the double, snap/circle, being having the most disturbance, in my experience.
 

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Practice and better technique will greatly reduce the amount of noise generated by both rod and line. The whirlwind sometimes heardd on stream by a spey caster is usually caused by having too much line stick or the anchor being placed too far downstream; although, it can also be caused by using a line that is too heavy for the rod.
 

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I have been lucky enough to have a local shop lend me 3 video's on casting, all three say the same thing. When your casting you need about 3 metres or yards of line on the water to act as the anchor to load your rod. They all say, if you're doing it right you will hear that short tearing sound.

Obviously I'm no expert but this is one of the things I remember from the videos.

Doug
 

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Doug - the 3 meters is only around 10 feet - nto alot and if usinga floating line with long leader it may only be the leader.

Gotta agree with others that any 2 part or 3 part cast (double, snap t or Perry poke) is going to make some noise. But if in a river situataion where you are casting 70 to 100 feet away, I would think the noise factor is minimal as Willie suggests unless very calm flat water. In those cases a single or spiral single and snake are much less noisy casts.
 

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spinyray re Spey Casting Noise

With my limited casting abilities, I wouldn't allow anyone to be close enough to me hear my mouse making tracks on the water. Anyone close enought to hear that sound would be in more danger of getting hit or whacked with a fly or my line.

On a more common factor that I have discovered fishing with Spey lines is how catching a fish in a run or seam on a Spey line puts the other fish down for about 10 minutes to 15 minutes after a fish has been hooked and fought in that run/seam spot.

My son and I discussed this yesterday. When I got back into flyfishing years ago he took me fishing on the Williamson and upper Rogue. With a two handed rod. I noticed that with a one handed rod that we would get one fish per seam spot inspite fish still hanging around. He felt that Natives did/do this.

What triggered my discussion with him was my last trip to Southern Oregon. On the lower Rogue, I was fortunate to get into some nice two salt native steelhead with my 7141 and the GS 7/8. If I hooked one and battled him even for a short time. The other fish in that area just hunkered down for about 15 minutes. I could go back to the tailgate of my Bronco and stand up see his brothers/sisters still in that area but with really restrictive movements. If I waited about 20 minutes and didn't cast in that seam, I would get another strike.

The same was replicated on the Lower Chetco the next day with Native Cuts, which are not the brightest fish. It worked out one fish per seam/spot per 15 to 20 minutes. If I waited that long, I usually hooked one on the first or second cast back in the spot.

Has anyone else had this experience in the NW or N. California? When I first got into Spey fishing, this became normal on the lower Yuba at the Sycamore Ranch area.
 
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