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Discussion Starter #1
I have the 15' CND Salar, which I really like, but have not yet got a heavy enough reel to balance it. None of my exisiting reels are heavy enough and the balance point is well beyond the handle. I did put a Billy Pate Tarpon (weighs 13 oz) on the rod and this did the trick.

I am wondering if a poorly balanced rod can introduce any casting errors and if so which I should look out for?

Also any recommendations of a reel to balance this rod would be really helpful.

Cheers

Barney
 

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Steelhead are cool!
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572 Posts
I don't think balance matters a whole lot when it comes to casting.
When I am fishing I like the rod to be some what balanced so I don't
have to hold the tip out of the water all day.
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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1,771 Posts
Hi Barney -

IMHO - The most important balance point should be gauged upon swinging the fly with the line out of the reel, not as much while casting unless grossly unbalanced. On the swing the tip should feel neither heavy nor light otherwise holding it at the right position will tire you over the course of a day. A cast takes only a quick moment whereas a swing lasts a relatively long time. When the line is on the reel, the balance is not a factor to casting since one can't cast with the line reeled up.

If the tip feels heavy while fishing, then in my humble opinion you might consider a heavier reel. It seems to me that a reel would have to be unusually heavy or light to be a nuisance while casting however there is much preference involved in this reply and to some the latter may be very important.

.02
 

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Here we go again!
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620 Posts
Hi Barney

I feel that if you are constantly fighting a tip heavy rod it detracts from the casting feel. I think this can enhance casting errors, or at least make it feel as if you are doing worse than you would with a well balanced rod. Since casting is muscle memory I think this off balance weight you feel fools with what your body percieves as feeling right, causing a natural tendency to try to compensate for that (which leads to bad form) or at least leads away from the muscle memory you've worked so hard to ingrain into your subconscious.

I have a Winston Derek Brown that was terribly tip heavy and once I had the balance issue corrected it became more enjoyble to cast, but I also noticed right off that I was casting better becuase I could let my cast go back to auto pilot. There was no extra effort called for where there should not have been, nothing to detract from the normal casting feel.

You mentioned that once you put on a heavier reel this did the trick. Did you find that you were casting better with less effort with the heavier reel?

Most of the fishing catalogs and websites list reel weight.You should be able to find plenty of reels in that weight category. I fished my Teton 12LA on the Salar and it felt good.
 

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JD
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3,609 Posts
reel balance

A trick that I use to compensate for light weight reels is to wrap thirty feet or so of lead core (LC-13) around the arbor. One oz.=437.5 gr. or 34 feet of lead core trolling line. It also builds up the arbor quicker than backing. Possibly a little extra bonus.

Another little trick, FWIW, is to hold the line under the first & second fingers of the top hand. Releasing the line on the shoot, leaving the third & pinky fingers to grip the rod. If you are still having trouble with the running line slipping from your grip, you can also use this same technique on the lower hand. Just run the running line down over the reel and straight to the lower hand without any slack. At least I think that's how I do it.

Oh, BTW, I have found that the resistance of pulling just a small part of that last loop of running line off the water, helps to turn over the last few feet of line. And if there is enough energy left for it (running line) to come tight with a twaaaaang, you've got a tuck cast. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Great inputs guys. Juro, I will certainly be on the lookout for a heavier reel for the Salar; the point about the bulk of the time being spent swinging the fly is very well taken. I have really been enjoying casting the rod, once I put the heavy reel on it just went up even another notch. I also liked the thought of using lead core to weight the reel.

Cheers

Barney
 
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