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Hi, I'm floating a local river with my friend this coming week and it has some nice spots that i'd like to try to fish with my spey rod from the boat. I have never fished a spey rod from a db. Can it be done? or will the D look hook the boat? we plan to anchor and get out to fish but there are some prime spots to hit if you can anchor and fish in the boat.

any help appriciated:) !

take care all,

chris:razz:
 

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Yes it is done all the time in Scotland.Double spey from the stern, assuing anchor in the bows
 

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Ghetto caster
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I do it all of the time. The guy in the downstream position must use the snake roll and the angler in the upstream seat has to use a snap t/c cast. Once you both get the flies rolled to the surface (assuming you're using tips) the upstream angler executes the "snap" of his cast and the downstream angler starts the snake. Both will be executing the forward strokes at roughly the same time. Make sure that you both know where you're aiming and it works just fine! Gives everyone a great reason to be proficient with both hands on top, unless you only fish one side of the river...
 

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The obvious answer(s) from above is 'yes,' but I'll insert a word of caution: Don't use rods over 14 feet in lenght; out of a boat 'shorter is better.' ;)
 

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fredaevans said:
The obvious answer(s) from above is 'yes,' but I'll insert a word of caution: Don't use rods over 14 feet in lenght; out of a boat 'shorter is better.' ;)

Fred,
Just curious as to why you say that. I've heard it from others also but never have understood why...I'm sure I'll feel silly when it's explained to me but that's OK.
 

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Fred

may have more reasons, but two that come to mind immediately are the difficulty of landing a fish with a long rod in a boat, provided you are successful at getting one, and longer rods require longer lines in general making it a little more difficult for anchor placement and control in the boat. Yes, I know you could use a Skagit style line to reduce the problems with the latter.
 

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Rich is on mark here.

The other item is one fisherman/woman looses track of the casting of the other. Not me involved, but I did see two folks (lady newbies?) in a local guides boat 'cross rods' ....:saeek:

It was not pretty .... and you could hear the 'crack!' from a hundred yards away.:whoa:

Forgot to add: the longer the rod(s), (in a boat) the greater the potential for rod "A" crossing path with rod "B."
 

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Ghetto caster
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I can see both of your points but will have to lend my perspective.
Landing fish has never been a concern in my boat. The man with the net goes to the stern and waits for the lucky angler to steer the fish to him.
I believe longer lines actually shine in boats for a couple of reasons. First is that you never have to adjust to different wading conditions. You are always "X" number of feet above the water and therefore have better control of anchor placement because there are fewer variables in the equation, like going from knee deep to waist deep in a couple steps. Second reason that longer lines are good in boats goes back to my point about being "X" number of feet above the water. When you get higher like this there is more propensity to blow your anchor, which makes the longer lines more beneficial and the skagit/shooting heads more tempermental. But, this brings me to the only negative that I can see of fishing longer rods from a boat, and that is the fact that it IS easier to blow your anchor because of the elevated perch.
Fred, obviously breaking rods is a bad thing but that is a possibility every time the rods are taken out of their tubes. Obviously you need to be cognizant of your surroundings.
Just my perspective...

Seth
 

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"Fred, obviously breaking rods is a bad thing but that is a possibility every time the rods are taken out of their tubes. Obviously you need to be cognizant of your surroundings."

Seth, a good point, but not that easy to do. Remember 'on the beach' casters will be quite a distance apart whereas in a boat ... maybe 12 to 14 feet? Either way, between both rods, you've got a lot of 'over lap' if someone(s) gets sloppy.:tsk_tsk:
 

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JD
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landing fish

First of all, most drift boats do not lend themselves to a lot of moving around. That is, anglers changing positions front to back, long rods and huge nets trying to get Mr fish into the latter. And to get Mr fish anyway near the side of the boat, the rod tip must be near the side of the boat. Very near the side of the boat.

If you are in the bow of the boat with a fifteen foot rod,,,:whoa: You figure it out. And that is just the start of it as there is no way I am gonna drop my anchor in the middle of the Rogue to help you.:chuckle:
 

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my recomendations=

12,,12.6 or shorter rods,,it's boss to be on a casting platform!,,but yes,netting or handling the fish `down the leader'alongside the boat intending to realease is wild with a longer rod,that is,,unless you have a gillie,;) ,(i should add=i had a tippet `POP' on me once hanging over the side anchored up ,using 14ft St Croix rod(and that was awhile ago!!,i chose to handle the leader down to the fish,as i reached out with my hemos,the fish got a good look at me:Eyecrazy: :hihi: shook his head/tippet parted and POPPED me in the eye/socket area,,it was nearly dark, i had removed my glasses,,i blinked all the way downriver to the ramp expecting to see blood,,i was lucky,keep your glasses ON,)
 
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