Spey Pages banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello All
I have this terrible dilemma, I recently scrounged up enough shekels to purchase a new spey rod and would greatly appreciate advice from those of you that have experience throwing T&T's. I presently own the Sage 8150 and was looking for something with a little more muscle. I'm heading up to the B.C./Skeena area this fall and would like to have a new rod in the arsenal. Besides B.C. I also fish the Olympic Peninsula. I have searched the site for previous posts concerning T&T's and was leaning towards the 1510-5 but was also thinking about their 9 wt..........................thoughts???????????? Thanks all, and Tight Lines!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
439 Posts
T&T's

Have both of the rods that you are asking about and like them a lot. They are not quite as fast as their 3pc cousins. Dana has a good review about the 1015-5 at his site. They both travel well. Hard choice.
Leroy..........................
 

·
loco alto!
Joined
·
3,052 Posts
I was in your exact situation a year ago. I wanted a stronger rod than the 8150 for fishing tips, but not so strong that it would overpower a typical 10 lb steelhead. Compared to the Sage 8150, I found that the T&T 1509 offerred "a little more muscle" that is appropriate for sink tip work. Compared to the 8150 is it a real power rod. Compared to the other T&T rods, it flexes noticeably more.

I fish the T&T 1509 with a custom 75' belly line for sink tips. This line icauses the 8150 to fold. Both rods throw the Windcutter 8/9/10, but differently. The T&T casts it off the tip, the Sage loads to the cork.
 

·
Pullin' Thread
Joined
·
4,694 Posts
As has been mentioned, the T&T's are a lot different than your 8150 Sage, and the T&T 1509 is the softest and slowest 2-hander in their line-up. Since you already have to 8150, which is a nice, slower recovering, soft side of medium stiff 8/9 rod, I'd recommend the 1510-5, which is a nice, fast recovering, 9/10 rod that travels very well and is slightly less stiff than the 1510-3.

I recommend the 1510-5 over the 1509 because the 1509 is an 8/9 rod and your 8150 is also an 8/9 rod. Unless you are planning to get rid of your 8150, you'd be better off getting the larger line 1510-5. The larger line 1510-5 will toss larger flies better than the 1509, and if you decide you want to move into the world of extended belly XLT, Carron, or GS lines, the 1510-5 casts them very well, the 1509 has a tendency to fold in its mid-section when casting these extended belly lines.

The 1510-5 is a pretty powerful rod that will cast off the top 1/3rd of the rod with Windcutter type lines, and cast with more of the blank loaded as you move to longer lines. I use my 1510-3 for summer steelhead on the larger rivers in Puget Sound and on the Hoh, lower Sol Duc, and Bogachiel with an 8/9 GS line. For winter fishing, I use my 1611 T&T because it tosses heavier sink tips and makes casting large flies pretty easy, although it is not a rod for everyone. The 1510-5 is slightly slower than my 1510-3; but it is still a fairly stiff, fast-recovering, and powerful rod. It is a very nice rod to use for winter steelhead on the Peninsula. Just keep in mind that everything will happen quite a bit faster with the T&T rods compared with yout Sage 8150 and the T&T 1510-5 will pick up and cast with far more authority because of it being more stiff, faster recovering, and more powerful than your Sage.
 

·
Relapsed Speyaholic
Joined
·
5,476 Posts
Nothing against the 1510-5, a great rod, but I too would throw in my .02 for the 1509-3. By way of comparison, I own both the 8150 Sage and the 1509 T&T. I have only spent a few hours on the 1510-3 and less on the 1510-5. I do fish the Skeena tribs or at least the mainstem and the Bulkley and Kispiox.

I agree with loco-alto, there is a big differnce between the 8150 and the 1509. While they will cast the some of the same lines, the T&T will easily handle line weights that will kill the 8150's action. If you are only looking for a heavier tips rod (Type 8 or similar) then I agree with Flytyer on the 1510. The Skeena system, in my experience, does not require this though. Much of the fishing you do up there can be handled with a floater. My experience would be that even when the Bulkley goes out, a type 3 or type 6 tip is all you need. The Kispiox, a river that is more often fished with tips, is not a deep and fast river under average flows so once again, a type 3 or 6 will suit your needs. The 1509-3 handles these weights with ease and is still a pleaure to cast with a longer bellied floater such as a 7/8 Grand Spey or the 10/11 Jetstream. The latter simply ROCKS on this rod either as a fuill floater or cur back 12-13' and looped for tips.

Whatever you decide. I think you will be happy.

sinktip
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top