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Hey Gang:

Thought I would pick the brain of the tiers here... Are any of you using bucktail for wings on tubes or other steelie/salmon flies? I'm not really thinking about hairwings, exactly. More like senyo or temple dog style flies. I think the bucktail would hold its shape in the current well and shed water for light casting. (My two problems with marabou and bunny).

If you are using, I'd appreciate any advice or insight I should consider. I'd love to see some flies that include bucktail, too, if folks feel like posting. (I've done a search and found some great ones already, but am sure I'm missing others.)

Anyway, hope you all are getting out and having some good days on the water,

Slint
 

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this type wing makes for a very nice streamer wing obviously as well. be carefull not to sinch them down to tight initially though, makes for a high wing.
 

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A dab of Crazy Glue

After initial tie in, very prone to pulling out
 

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Watch how Davie McPhail ties in hair wings. If you mimic, the bucktail will def not pull. In fact, there are prob more bucktail wing flies fished for atlantics in Europe than anything else (think Cascades and Willie Gunns).

The whole point of a Temple Dog is a soft, moving wing so bucktail really isnt the best bet if thats the style you are going for. Ill bet Willie Gun or other, traditional, Scottish-style hairwing tubes with bucktail would work fine for steelhead. I dont think the fly really matters so much, but thats a conversation for another time, I guess.
 

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After initial tie in, very prone to pulling out
3 or 4 tight wraps of thread and then some cement; allow a minute to set up and continue. I've been using it for years and if you do what I describe to all your hair wings they'll stick around as long as you have the fly.

If you use it tying in the round for Intruders or on tubes just put a small ball (2 - 3 wraps) of chenille right behind where the hair will be mounted. The chenille will help to flair it out. Don't worry if it flares out to a 45* angle because the current will train it back. I'll look to see if I have any pictures that illustrate my hair flies and come back and post them.

Ard

I'm pretty sure this is white bucktail as wing on this Thor adaptation.



This is a Freight Train tube, the dubbed body forms a slight ball behind the wing mount on these flies.


Sorry but I don't have pictures of what's in my various boxes. I'm sure some of the guys will have more & better examples but those 2 are a start. You can see by the cones that weight doesn't bother me. I use the hair for the reason you mentioned, it keeps a better profile than softer stuff like fox.
 

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This observation is a little late, but one thing not mentioned is buy only good quality buck tail. Long, thin fibers of hair will produce the best action. These types of tails have hair that is only hollow in the very butts of the fibers and this portion of the fiber is generally not tied in, usually clipped off before use. That said this type of hair does not compress easily and the above advice for tight wraps and glue is appropriate. I use buck tail and other fibers in combination for winging of my coastal flies.
rvreclus
 
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