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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have had a brown colored Sage 6126 made in 1999...specifically serial number U3882, made from graphite IV, 6 7/16 oz in weight. I purchased this rod in 2000 and only now am I back in a fishery (Lake Erie tribs in Ohio) where I feel it has a real application (steelhead). I picked up a Rio WC 6/7/8 tmultiple tips line and even got a lesson in spey casting (with more comong this summer).

Now I am also interested in Skagit casting as well a overhead casting (here I'm thinking of "surf casting" to steelhead when they cruise the shoreline). After studying the many threads on this site pertaining to the Sage 6126 I was ready to but a Rio Skagit 450 grain line for Skagit casting and was going to try a bunch of my heavier single hand rod lines (like my Rio Striper line with tips) for overhead casting.

Well just this weekend I went to the Midwest Fly Show in Michigan and talked to the Rio rep there. When discussing my Skagit line plans he asked what color rod I had. After telling him what I outlined above he said the older brown rods of this series are softer/slower than the newer green rods and that the Skagit 450 would be too much and that I should go with the head of a WC 10/11/12. He based his opinion on the fact that he owns (or at least owned) and has experience with both of these rods.

So now I would like to appeal to the folks on this forum for advice and council.
Is there really that much difference in the action and power between the older brown and the newer green sage 6126 rods? If yes, am I at a disadvantage with my older brown rod? Was the Rio rep I talked to giving me a truely objective recommendation...or...was perhaps his casting style more aggressive which would make the brown rod appear too soft for the Skagit 450? Finally, are there any line recommendations out there for overhead casting?

Thanks in advance for your responses.
 

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I have the brown 6126 - it casts the 450g Skagit just fine. I use tips ranging from the floating 12' of a 9/10/11 Windcutter right up to 12' of T-14.
I think indevidual casting style is a definite factor in which lines one casts with a given rod.
speydoc
 

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JoeG said:
I have had a brown colored Sage 6126 made in 1999...specifically serial number U3882, made from graphite IV, 6 7/16 oz in weight. I purchased this rod in 2000 and only now am I back in a fishery (Lake Erie tribs in Ohio) where I feel it has a real application (steelhead). I picked up a Rio WC 6/7/8 tmultiple tips line and even got a lesson in spey casting (with more comong this summer).

Now I am also interested in Skagit casting as well a overhead casting (here I'm thinking of "surf casting" to steelhead when they cruise the shoreline). After studying the many threads on this site pertaining to the Sage 6126 I was ready to but a Rio Skagit 450 grain line for Skagit casting and was going to try a bunch of my heavier single hand rod lines (like my Rio Striper line with tips) for overhead casting.

Well just this weekend I went to the Midwest Fly Show in Michigan and talked to the Rio rep there. When discussing my Skagit line plans he asked what color rod I had. After telling him what I outlined above he said the older brown rods of this series are softer/slower than the newer green rods and that the Skagit 450 would be too much and that I should go with the head of a WC 10/11/12. He based his opinion on the fact that he owns (or at least owned) and has experience with both of these rods.

QUOTE]

How does your Brownie 6126 cast with the WC 678? With tips 1 & 2, the total grain weight is 482 grains. If your Brownie can handle the WC, it should be able to easily handle a Skagit 450 grain line.

An alternative which will enable you to Skagit and overhand cast out to where the steelhead are swimming might be the Rio Outbound WF floating lines. The 10 WF Floater has a total grain head of 425 grains or the 11 WF Floater has a total grain head of 465 grains. Your WC tips will work with these OBs. I have no ideal which would work best for you. If you use an OB to Skagit cast, you can go with a smaller reel and save even more money. The Skagits require good size reels. My 450 Skagit fills up my Loop 3W. My OB 10 Floater fits on a Redington 9/10 CD reel with 100 yards of backing and room to spare at about half the cost and less reel weight. Last but not least the OB lines cost $65.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you Speydoc and Grampa Spey...your responses are appreciated.

Speydoc...I am glad to hear that the "brown" Sage 6126 will handle the 450 grain Skagit line with tips as heavy as 12ft of T14. I feel a bit better about owning this rod.

Grampa Spey...I like your suggestion of using the Rio OB line for both Skagit as well as overhead casting. Based on some of your previous posts (where the OB 10 wt worked better on your Sage 5120 than on your Sage 6126) I think that I should start with the OB 11wt for my Sage 6126!?

Also with respect to your question...in my not very skilled hands the WC 678 works fine. I participated in lessons given by Juro at the Catt Clave last fall and used this line...I got no negative comments when Juro demonstrated some casts to me using my rod with this line. However at number of us got together for a spey casting session here in Ohio afterwards and I got at least one opposing opinion. Two skilled casters were mentoring us tyros and one of the skilled guys thought my rod cast like a wet noodle with the WC 678 and suggested I either get a WC 56 for it ...or ...better yet replace it with a Scott rod. Interestingly the other skilled guy cast my outfit and thought it was just great! I noticed the first guy was an aggressive caster and seemed to really push or power the rod through the cast. The second guy was more refined and paced and timed his casts to let the rod do the work for him.So as Speydoc comments in his reply, casting style is a factor in the rod/line matchup.

Thanks again.
 

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6126

I wouldn't put much faith in this, but I thought that the 6126 _didn't_ change when it went from brown to green. In any case, I don't find the brown 6126 to be a noodle in the least, though if pushed too hard (as you've seen) it certainly can be. The skagit 450 works fine on this rod, and if you're looking for a floating line, the Airflo 6/7 is a dream. It's probably my favorite rod to cast with, though you definitely should let the rod do the work. Slow down, relax, breathe, and boom, out she goes, as Mel K. says. Grampa and Speydoc know of what they speak.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
An improved version of the 6126!?

Debarb...thanks for your reply...you have further increased my faith in this rod and given me yet another line option.

I dug up some notes I made some time after I bought this rod. Looks like I called the folks at Sage to talk about line options and came to learn they had designed for 2001 a "new" version of the 6126. While my notes make no reference to color, they do make mention that the new design was a little lighter (especially "in hand") and a little faster ("crisper"). I now remember being a bit miffed at this time...having spent a fair chunk of cash on a highly touted rod ("A Two-Handed Rod for All Seasons") by Sage only to find out a year later that a new (and presumably improved) design was being offered.
Oh well...so it goes.
 
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