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Discussion Starter #1
I am about to start tying bombers for an Atlantic Salmon trip. Last time I showed up with boxes of bombers and the guides laughed at me as they were too small. We threw bombers that looked more like chickens. I would say the bodies were around 2 inches long. If anyone has any suggestions for hooks or even better if they have a bunch that would work that are just sitting around let me know. Ideally I would like something with a better gap in it than a streamer hook.

Any input is appreciated.

Brayden
 

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Nuff Said

Next!!!!:)
 

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Those hooks are the bomb...er

When I saw this post I felt obligated to reply because I have been tying bombers every day now for the past 3 weeks! I am almost "bombered out".

I still use streamer hooks and have no problem with them. Currently I have been using the tiemco streamer hooks. They have a bit of a curve which creates a slightly more open gap than the other streamer hooks I have.
I have tied on the partridge bomber hooks which are quite nice. The down side to those is the higher price & the lack of availability in my area.

At the end of the day when I trim the deer hair on my bombers I try cut straight across the bottom on the smaller hook sizes to create as large a gap as possible.

Good Luck & please let us know what you go with!

Glen
 

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The CS42 is a nice hook, however the Daiichi 2131 is nice as well and has a slightly longer shank and I prefer the up turned eye for skating.

Another solid mention and my choice would be the Partridge code "N" hook. Great for larger offerings and keeping the hook gap in check. A very strong hook and not heavy at all for the size. It's a low water hook and a medium weight iron, not a classic Bomber hook, but it fits the bill. Again, up turned eye for me is preferred for skating or for a hitching.

When are you going Brayden ??


Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What is the biggest size they make? Does anyone have an actual measurement on the size of the hook?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the input everyone. The trip is in late June early July. Should be great. I will track down some of those hooks and get tying.
 

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If you want a huge Bomber, you could always tie one on a plastic tube (though the guides would probably object to that too)
 

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GreenButtBomber (Loren) swears by Bombers on tubes. He puts a hole though the extended tube (on the bottom) and threads the tippet through that instead of through the front of the tube to help them skate. He tells me that the light weight really helps them skate, especially when rigged as describe. Of course, this is for BC steelhead, not Atlantics, but I can't believe that it would make a difference. He told me a of a European company that makes them that way - FishMadMan. I bought a few, and they look good. Perhaps Loren will chime in on this.

Jim
 

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GreenButtBomber (Loren) swears by Bombers on tubes. He puts a hole though the extended tube (on the bottom) and threads the tippet through that instead of through the front of the tube to help them skate. He tells me that the light weight really helps them skate, especially when rigged as describe. Of course, this is for BC steelhead, not Atlantics, but I can't believe that it would make a difference. He told me a of a European company that makes them that way - FishMadMan. I bought a few, and they look good. Perhaps Loren will chime in on this.

Jim

Yup, Bombers on tubes is the only way to go for big ones. The numbers of coho I used to lose on long shank Bombers completely disappeared when using Gami Octopus hooks on tubes...

The leading end deer hair should be either split or flattened to create the waking effect, but a better trick is a judicious bit of UV curing resin at the base of the hair to create essentially a plastic scoop on the front end...

Last week in Patagonia at Strobel Lake the Bomber beat the Chernobyl Ant as the best indicator dry and the fish did not mind hammering them occasionally, either!

Down with foam! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you all for the input. The way to go from what I gathered was dead drifted bombers. I may pick up some of the tubes to try as well. Can anyone recommend a tube system that will hold the tube steady enough so that you can wrap it tight enough to spin deer hair. I have one of the "Clamp" into my normal vise systems and 90% of the reason I do not tie tubes is that I find they spin no matter how I adjust the system.

Thanks again
Brayden
 

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I use ProTubes with their mandrel that just clamps in the vise jaws. It is flat, and it you push the tube onto it firmly enough, spinning has not been problem. In fact, getting it off the mandrel can be the challenge. And I use it when spinning hair on a tube, and it works well.

Jim
 

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I would also agree that, for making larger bombers, using tubes is the way to go, because you can simply make them any size you like, and at the same time, thereafter add any size hook behind that tube.

However, there is no 'magic bullet' tube fly system;

Tying on tubes for floating ties means plastic tubes. It doesn't matter much whether that plastic is nylon, polythene, or another polymer.

What matters is, as you have eluded to, is how to hold that plastic tube in your tying vice.

There are essentially two ways of holding a tube in a vice: either the end of the tube is held in a Jacobs style drill chuck (there are many variants of this), or the tube is slid over a pin or mandrel and an interference fit between the outer surface of this pin/mandrel and the inner surface of the tube means that it won't spin during wrapping of your tube tie.

The best form of pin or mandrel is a matched tapered pin, closely matched to the inner diameter of the plastic tube you are using , and simply pushing the tube onto that tapered pin until it is tight (the interference fit).

As has been discussed & demonstrated in many previous threads concerning these matters on holding tubes on pins or mandrels, there is no need for the fly tying tool supply companies to provide dedicated 'system specific' pins or mandrels; why re-invent the wheel? There are already many tapered pins out there used for other purposes which can be co-opted for use in holding our plastic tubes: examples include the tapered shaft of a blind-eye hook, crochet hooks (come in sizes from ~0.5mm through to 10mm outer diameter), needles (eg darning & tapestry needles), the tapered pin sets which are used to expand ear piercing holes, and the stepped needles which are called felting needles.

As to holding the tube end on the outside, there are several different fly tying vices which are dedicated tube fly tying vices, eg the one produced by HMH. There are other vices where you can replace the standard jaws with a dedicated tube holding attachment like the HMH has. You can also take a set of very cheap pin vices with variable size collets (up to 3mm) which can be relatively simply and cheaply attached to a similarly cheap standard vice as a replacement to the original standard jaws. It all depends on your pocket, how much of your tying is going to be on tubes, and how innovative you are to make the minor adaptations to the already available tools which are already out there.

IMHO, the worst of all worlds for holding tubes is what appears to be the most common form of tube fly tying attachment which clamps into the jaws of your standard hook vice; these are usually supplied with 2 or 3 different diameter parallel steel pins with a brass bead or button on one end, where the user is expected to hold the tube by interference clamping fit of the tube ends between the vice and the brass bead at the end of the pin. Such a simple (and generally inadequate) tube pin system is the one most tyers usually complain that the tubes spin during tying; whilst you can adapt that smoothe parallel pin/mandrel to hold the tube ends more effectively (by adding a small section of silicone tube at either end), there are better methods (tapered pins as above) out there.


Mike
 

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Ever try bass bug popper hooks?
 
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