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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I usually fly to fishing destinations and am faced with the tough decision on how to pack my two handers. I put mine in a golf bag cover up with wheels. This allows me to send my four piece rods along with some clothes, waders etc; I cannot manage three piece rods etc. Does anyone have any good suggestions? Thanks, I'd sure appreciate it!
 

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I use a Harding Bros. rod/reel case and check it with the reel mounted. It works great! Sage also makes excellent cases for two-hand rods. I have a double that holds two four piece 15ft rods with reels mounted. They also make cases for 3pc rods. I believe Harding Bros will custom make you a case if there isn't a stanadrd model available. I know that they make a case for 15ft rods broken down in half (4pc rod with the middle furrel disassembled only) so length isn't a problem.

You'll have to find another place for those musty waders though.

Good luck

PS My big rod is now on its way to the belly of the plane in a Harding case. I'm writing this from the airport gate awaiting my flight south to take me on my pursuit of the mother of all steelhead!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks very much; I have reviewed the archives and they were a big help. This is apparently a recurring problem with multiple solutions. Thanks again! Warren
 

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We ended up purchasing Sage's 4", 43 inch tube. It worked perfectly for our 13' ish rods. We tried to order from Harding but despite our repeated calls, no one picked up the phone. (Originally we were going to use our 43" rod carrier from Fishpond but the Spey tubes were 1/2" too big).

Over the winter we are going to order a leather rod case. We decided not travel commercially with a leather case as we feel it screams "steal me". FYI - on both ends of our flight to and from Oregon, the United staff recognized the Sage "tube" as being a rod case and handed it to a staff member to hand deliver to TSA.

Best,
David
 

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Transport

I got a Sporttube from Mike at Redshed and just love the way it performed. It toted four spey rods in their hard cases and could handle a lot more if need be, give him a call and dicuss your needs with him. You could never find someone who will do more to see that you get what you need.
 

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PVC Pipe

Somewhere in the archives, ( about three months back ? ), this was given some attention. I recall The Irish Angler had something available off the shelf as it were. Electrical or plumbing distributors carry PVC conduit and the requisite fittings to make an indestructible traveling tube. As an electrical guy, I bought the following. 10' - 4" inside diameter schedule 20 pvc conduit ~ 1 - 4" cap ~ 1 - 4" female adapter ~ 1 - 4" male plug ~ 1 - small can of pvc glue
Cut the conduit to the desired length, glue on the end cap and the female adapter and your ready to go, ( the male plug obviously screws into the female adapter ). Not much for the "GQ" look, but functional. If you want a handle and/or a locking system a bit of creativity will get it done.
 

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Being basically a cheapskate, I've made a number of rod cases over the years. For the money, the commercially available Bazuka case can't be beat. It will hold up to 5 three piece spey rods, or 4 4-piecers. Very durable, and for $35 you can't go wrong.

If you are making a case, I would very strongly recommend going with schedule 40 4" ABS drain pipe rather than PVC. In colder climates, the PVC can shatter, with devastating results on your rods. The ABS is incredibly tough, way tougher than any commercially available product. I did have one time where Alaska Airlines put the tongue of a forklift into one of my cases, ruining three of the rods there, but it is hard to imagine how what kind of force had to be applied to cause the damage. Anyway, Alaska did the right thing and reimbursed me for the rods (after about 4 months).

You can cut the 4" Schedule 40 to any length you need. Although many airlines have theoretical maximum dimensions of bags (e.g. a combination of L + W + H of 108", I have never had any problems with rod tubes up to 66" long. You can get fancy threaded end caps, or slip over caps; I drill a 3/8" hole in the butt caps, cut some foam to fit in the end, glue one to the tube for the bottom, slip the other end cap for the cap. I attach section of climbing webbing (for a carrying strap) and put grommets (for a lock) or a snap to hold the end on. Anchor the webbing with 1/2" stainless hex bolts. I've taken these homemade jobs to the UK and Russia many times without any problems. You can even Duct tape two cases together if you need to take a bunch of rods. Everything raw materials wise (including hardware, webbing, caps, tube, glue, snaps, grommets) will run you about $35-40, and you can make one in about an hour.
 
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