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I know it is an old thread. But, just like the classic reels, this conversation never gets old IMHO. I like the sound of a Perfect. JW Young is good too. Have not fished a Bogdan, Olson, or Saracione.

Your thoughts? There must be some more candidates in this category since 2013.
 
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Well.......a vintage Hardy trout or salmon Perfect with the 1912 Check plays a pleasant melody with a running Bright or Springer, but sometimes the “Sounds of Silence” are preferable.

My favourite Hardy salmon song is played by the 1914 era 4 and 4 1/2 inch Silex fly and casting reels. This versatile model has a centre pin style free spool option that is useful for greased lining, dead drifting, deeper, slower or faster swings, while performing various line control mends.
This selective silent free spool setting also serves as a “mute” for the click and pawl preset check while the reels innovative cut away rim enables the angler to apply drag by palming the spool rim. The silent check option is useful in bear or sea lion country for excluding uninvited guests. This also serves to calm a running salmon, paniced by the sound and vibration of the loud clicking pawl which travels down to it through the line. This unique feature also facilitates “walking the dog” or leading a calmed salmon back upstream under a gentle silent line retrieve, to the pool or run where you hooked it. This old forgotten Scottish ploy can help avoid being spooled, or loosing line control, resulting in a lost salmon.
Enclosed is a photo of my vintage 4 1/2 inch Silex in action, with its two inch wide spool shallow arbour, designed for a quick and silent retrieve. I wouldn’t have been able to hook this Springer without the reels features that made it easy to control the depth, speed, and angle of my Ghost stonefly. Nor would I have been able to land this salmon as it used the high water currents to rip out over 200 yards of line downstream through impassable water. I calmed and stopped it running with the vibration free silent check in free spool under minimal tension, and avoided being spooled. I was then able to silently walk and while retrieving, lead it back upstream to its lie where we’d originally been introduced. Using the palming feature, I was in control of the 3rd round of the fight and able to instantly snub and lock the reel spool, preventing the salmon from running downstream again. and then to quickly lead it into the net. all in under 15 minutes.
This facilitated a successful release, as this Springer was not overstressed or exhausted, and shot way, well able to avoid predators, and to continue its journey up the Restigouche to spawn.
Regards from Matapedia Run...Jim
Water Plant Hat Lake Outdoor recreation
 

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While each of the several models of Hardy Silex reels have their individual and distinctive 'voices', they were designed and marketed as casting reels- advertised as such from 1899 until their last model in the 1987 catalogue (see pictures attached).
The Hardy Longstone would be a preferable fly reel, an opinion shared by L R Hardy it seems, managing director of the firm for more than 50 years, who landed a 40lb salmon on a fly from the side of Norway's River Aora using one, without a boat to follow it.. The Longstone was correctly marketed as:
'For trolling or casting in sea, loch or rivers, also makes a good fly reel'
The extra strong optional check, central tension adjuster on earlier models, plus 'full' palming and more than ample line capacity for modern plastic fly lines and backing (unlike most Silex's) the sound of my 1928 model is unusual, in that it is relatively quiet from such a capable check.

Malcolm
 

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Have to chime in here with my love of the 6 Farlex reels I have and fish with. 4/ 3 3/4" and 2/ 4". Each with a sound of thier own distintive sound with a running fish. I'm practically deaf so listening to the payout sound of a running fish is very pleasant to me. I like my silent retrieves more than the click on the retrieve.
Steelie Addict
 

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The best sounding reel is the one with a good fish peeling line off it.

Options (pick 1):
1. Sound of <add snappy reel name here> tied into a hot <steelhead, salmon> in 2019 when actually fished on good water at the right time a d there wasn't a <pandemic, wildfire, polar bear infestation, etc.).
2. Sound of <add super snappy reel name here> when stripping off line while sitting at the tying bench working on four fingers of bourbon.
3. The barely audible plastic clicker on a worn reel (e.g., 1989 Ross Gunnison 4) that you actually help joked a nice fish on within reliable memory (e.g., a bigger striper that smacked a fly when shadding).

The winning contestant will take Door #3 with leaky waders and an empty flask as long as the take is on the swing.
 

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Malcolm-
What is the age of the box in the photo that you show, the box is held together or reinforced with metal on the edges. I have a similar box same color and construction from Forest and Sons has a two digit phone number listed on the box. Always wondered on the age of the box not sure what time period had two digit numbers in Scotland.
 

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I would say 1920/ 30's from what I have seen, possibly earlier, however stapled corners were not unusual even early on. The box pictured fits the reel exactly, complete with some inside 'leading' ring from the reel, but you can never be totally sure unless the model is marked on the outside label, and not even then.. The reel can be dated pretty well to 1928, due to being able to pin down the not that usual porting and length of foot etc.
The stapled corner thick card box came next (generally speaking) probably around WW2 and remained in use to the early 50's, then we get into the thick cream card boxes with edges first blue then red following. After that we entered the thinner box era from the mid/late 60's into the 70's, taking us to the 80's with very thin Hardy white card boxes.
I would not be surprised if there was not a main box manufacture who printed them up for various companies, they also were used for smaller items, certainly by Hardy's.
No idea about the 2 digit telephone number , my old Hardy boxes only have Telegram details, it could be worth finding out from dated catalogues to cross reference the reel boxes possibly.

Malcolm
 

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Thanks. Not to hijack this thread or go in a different direction but here is a photo of the box in question. I got the box with a bunch of gut eye salmon flies.
Brown Rectangle Wood Font Flooring

Brown Rectangle Wood Publication Font


Product Font Material property Art Wood
 

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For Steelhead Spey - Burkheimer 7 wt, Echo 3 7wt and Anderson 6 wt. For trout spey a Winston 4 wt.
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Saracione Mark V 3 3/4" Standard Salmon Reel. I use it with a 6 wt Anderson Rod. On a calm day you can hear it all over the river when a steelhead runs. Just unhooking the fly from the rod and stripping out line really gets your blood warmed up!
 

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From my experience the reels which I like the sound of are Hardy (Perfect, Zenith, Marquis, etc) they are loud and no mistaking when a fish is hooked. I also enjoy the sound of the Bogdan reels which have a more refined or smoother sound. Either way I like a reel which makes noise or sound. I fish with some buddies who have reels with silent drags and they just don’t do it for me.
 

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Nothing sounds better than the classics in my opinion. The Dingley I recently acquired has a deep, loud throaty click. Can't wait for a fish to activate it.
 
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