Spey Pages banner

1 - 20 of 55 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
680 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I need a new place to live. Unfortunately, BC won't let me in (For those of you who say, "If you don't like the US, leave!" - It doesn't work that way. You can't just move where you want.) so I am limited to the US. I am considering Southern Oregon as the front runner right now - maybe in the Ashland area. The Rogue is there. The Umpqua is close. The Klamath is close - other NorCal trout fisheries are pretty close. The coastal streams are't too far. But, I am open to anywhere, really.

Where is the best place to live for swinging flies for steel?

Thank you in advance for your suggestions.
 

·
Dedicated Fisherman
Joined
·
3,262 Posts
This is the honest truth according to Ard.

Pick a home close to a river that has a history of steelhead trout being present. Don't stress over the location having large numbers of fish because if it does it will also have large numbers of fishermen.

Seriously, if I know that a river has counted at least 500 fish I'm good fishing there. The number of days I may fish without catching a steelhead has no effect on me. I enjoy fishing, searching, working my line and fly. When I finally have one grab it doesn't matter if I get it or not, at least I know I was right for working that spot.

My home river isn't listed as having steelhead and I am so thankful for that. I average 2 a year there and am always alone. Sometimes I travel to places where there are a lot of them but there are always boats drifting through with bead fishermen in them contaminating the area. I catch more fish there but there are also some days when people fish right through my water.

I'd rather fish somewhere where I think there's a chance and am alone than put up with all sort of yahoo that cab afford a fly rod.

Funny I was just thinking of looking for a place for sale closer to where I like to fish just today...…...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
680 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I like New Zealand, but again, immigration is illegal, so I'm stuck in the US. (pretty solid song and video, btw)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
If you like catching steelhead, hard to beat where you are already thinking. If you like to catch big winter steelhead in the rain, along with your 50 best new friends, Forks, WA. If you like to catch steelhead nymphing in cold weather, the Great Lakes.
 

·
fly fisher 'til it's over
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
I'm with you Ard. I'd rather fish all day alone and get skunked rather than combat fish and catch fish every cast. I like the solitude, and the quiet songs of the river.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
If you like catching steelhead, hard to beat where you are already thinking. If you like to catch big winter steelhead in the rain, along with your 50 best new friends, Forks, WA. If you like to catch steelhead nymphing in cold weather, the Great Lakes.
A good number of us in the Great Lakes swing for steelhead.
And do quite well, thank you

Emel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
According to a lot of west coast fisherman there are no steelhead here in the great lakes. And all they do here is chuck and duck or nymphing (bobber fishing) so I'm not sure that's even fly fishing although they are using a fly rod. I just go out and swing flies to keep my spey casting stroke up to par and every once in a while I'll hook one of those funny looking chrome fish with rosie cheeks. Quite pretty fish by the way. So yeah there's no steelhead here. LOL
 

·
Broken Down Spey Freak
Joined
·
1,552 Posts
According to a lot of west coast fisherman there are no steelhead here in the great lakes. And all they do here is chuck and duck or nymphing (bobber fishing) so I'm not sure that's even fly fishing although they are using a fly rod. I just go out and swing flies to keep my spey casting stroke up to par and every once in a while I'll hook one of those funny looking chrome fish with rosie cheeks. Quite pretty fish by the way. So yeah there's no steelhead here. LOL
A tight line grab is still a tight line grab regardless if it's PNW or G/L. A Land locked salmon is still a salmon no?

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
680 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I think the debate there is all about whether they are natural/wild. By definition, a "true" steelhead goes to the salt, not a freshwater lake. Everyone understands they are the same species (actually all rainbow trout are genetically the same from what I have read) and that hooking and fighting one is the same fishing experience from a physical standpoint, but the lake run ones are not in quite the same natural realm since they do not go to the ocean, which is a much more dangerous and wild and diverse aquatic world than a lake. It is somewhat along the same lines as why people think it is "cooler" and "more fun/interesting" to catch a wild trout vs a stocked hatchery trout.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
BC
Wouldn’t take me

Guess they didn’t want anymore
Environmental scientists

They will take you if you have
Over 600,000$ in da bank

Or if you are part of an investment capital
Firm willing to bring lots of dough in to the country.

At least that’s how I remember it .

Pay to play

I lived in Ashland for a a year
About 20 years ago and loved it!!
It was the year of the flood!

It used to be cheap to live there
and now it is not :-(

Let us know where you end up!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
newcomer to spey casting
Joined
·
213 Posts
Some Western guides think the Muskegon steelhead fight just as hard as the hallowed steelhead of the PNW. I heard that on a podcast in which Vokey interviewed Feenstra. She also implied that the lower great lakes steelhead were definitely not in the same league. In my own limited experience, a 13 lb buck swing up from a lake Erie tributary pulls about as hard as a big Wyoming wild rainbow. Having never fished the PNW steelhead dream destinations or the Muskegon, I can't make that comparison.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,520 Posts
BC is great to visit in Steelhead seasons but do you really want to spend the winter there? :chuckle:

I probably have more Mediterranean genes than most, but being anywhere in the Midwest in the winter goes double as far as I would be concerned. I caught a beautiful perfectly chrome winter hen yesterday a few miles from the ocean on the south OR coast, that took me into my backing, and while I have occasionally “suffered” there in the “winter” (robins are starting to sing their mating songs there already) yesterday it was sunny and in the high 50s F. We saw only one other boat the whole day, and were kind of surprised. How could you want better without being greedy?

So I think your first pass answer was a great one in our region - the upper rogue valley area (Ashland, Medford, grants pass) is a fabulous nexus of 12 months a year Steelhead fishing with all of Oregon and northern CA in easy access, and the rogue for daily 20 min access, not to mention something like 80 miles of water between the dam and the gorge. Deschutes, N. Umpqua, CA and OR coasts, not to mention, if you are so inclined, some great trout fisheries nearby - Williamson, Fall, Deschutes again, etc. etc.

I have a Steelheading friend who just moved to Medford and I may set up a tent in his yard.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
680 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Donkey, BC will take you if you are willing to invest 2,000,000 into a business venture. From the forms I filled out, they didn't seem to be interested in your net worth (600,000 never came up) in any way, but I didn't investigate more beyond filling out the questionnaire to see if you could move there.

Bocast, I listened to that podcast, too. I thought Feenstra said the GL steel were awesome to catch also and on the same level, but maybe I remember wrong.

Botsari, If I move there, you can pitch a tent!
 

·
JD
Joined
·
3,609 Posts
When I showed up on the Rogue with a Spey rod to swing flies, they told me I picked the wrong river. Most fly fishers here are bobber fishers, & they either camp on a spot or drift right thru where you're fishing. And that's just the fly fishers. The gear fishers are a whole nuther breed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
The GL fishery is an interesting fishery and very diverse. The Michigan tribs like the Muskegon and the Pere Marquette have gorgeous spawning gravel so a large portion of the steelhead have evolved over the years due to repeat spawners. The Pere Marquette steelhead have a reputation of being an almost super race. both rivers have steelhead that reach 20lb. The hardest fighting steelhead i ever caught was caught on the PM and I have fished for chrome from alaska to the kispiox and Bulkley to west coast US tribs. The only thing that compared to it was a 20+lb buck i hooked on the Kispiox while fishing with Bob Clay many years ago. Now the lake Erie tribes are a little different. They don't have the spawning gravel like the michigan tribs so repeat spawners are very few if any so a 15lber is a rare find. a lot of fish 6-9lb. I heard April's podcast too and Kevin Feenstra will tell you the same that GL steelhead are just as aggressive. I fish with Kevin a lot. He was swinging flies here before anyone was. I would love to see bocast bring his Wyoming trout rod here and hook a 13lb. buck. That comparison is kind of hard to believe. Unless he just hooked a 13lb buck that someone had just clubed in the head. Another great resource is our lake run browns that we occasionally hook when swinging for chrome. But west coast, great lakes or wherever its all good.
 

Attachments

·
Hacker
Joined
·
589 Posts
A tight line grab is still a tight line grab regardless if it's PNW or G/L. A Land locked salmon is still a salmon no?

Dan
It's all in the genes baby! Those in the Great Lakes, some populations in the Columbia that are sealed off from the ocean because of dams, they still have those feisty genes that make them grow big and sassy!

Another way to look at it, I do not feel any less the fisher when I catch a big brown in Montana or Wyoming because they are not originally from there. They still have those nasty brown trout genes that make them what they are!

As for the OP, I think it would be a good excuse to explore for a few years and see what you like best!
 

·
newcomer to spey casting
Joined
·
213 Posts
...

Bocast, I listened to that podcast, too. I thought Feenstra said the GL steel were awesome to catch also and on the same level, but maybe I remember wrong...

Botsari, If I move there, you can pitch a tent!
Skol Bandit, I am agreeing that Feenstra's fish are every bit the equal of those in the PNW. Vokey was confirming that opinion. The southern shore Lake Erie buck I swung up on a 10 ft. 7 wt. Orvis Helios single hand was great fun but not quite the dynamite that Feenstra's fishery holds, by all accounts. I am fishing small spate tribs in Ohio and Pennsylvania. The steel down here remind me of the big North Platte trout. I love em' anyway, but I know that a trip to Michigan waters would put me on fish at the top level of fighting spirit. If I heard the podcast correctly Vokey did not seem to be enamored of the fish in my local waters; I didn't get the sense that she would make my local waters a destination fishing choice for her, but she would gladly fish Feenstra's local waters for the chrome there. Apologies if anyone thought I was discrediting Muskegon chrome. I believe what the experts say about those fish as being top notch game fish. I now fish a 7 wt. 12'9" Echo Glass Spey and would use that rod in Michigan if I ever get the chance. I would be sure to be rested, have a solid grip on my rod and steady footing when I try to tackle Michigan steel.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 
1 - 20 of 55 Posts
Top