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Discussion Starter #1
I started learning to spey cast last summer.
When I bought the rod I was set up with a Cortland DT Spey line.

After some brief chats with other spey casters I get the impression that the cortland is not the best line for me to use.

I'm interested in purchasing a new line.


The question is what line should I get?

The rod I have is a Redington Redfly 13' 8/9

I figure I a Rio Grandspey or SA XLT would be wasted on a short rod like this, but maybe I'm wrong.

The Rio Windcutter is touted as being great for beginners.
Is this true?

What about the Rio Midspey?

My overall stragtegy is to get a good floating line, then rig a second spool with a made or purchased multi-tip.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

--Mike
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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Would you be using this in the Kalama itself or one of the other larger rivers to the north or south?

I used a DTF for my whole first summer of Spey casting and caught way more fish than ever before due to being able to fish new water and line control with skaters and wets. Much of this was on big rivers like the Cowlitz and mid-sized like the Lewis R's.

I only went to a short spey head when winter made it too hard to throw sinktips for distance with a DTF / cut.

Now I like the midspey length or shorter for winter and longer belly spey lines like the Grandspey are reserved for summer use as an all-around dry line on longer rods.

So IMHO the answer really depends on how you are planning on using it, size of river, sinktips, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I used this rig to fish a few spots on lower Kalama. I liked the abilty to the throw a weighted streamer with long leader last summer. Late last fall I finally got a single handed rod I feel comfortable using on steelhead. So the spey rod will mostly used on the Cowlitz and Lewis. It will also be used on some of the Wisconsin Tribs of Lake Michigan.
 
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