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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, thanks first for a fine forum I've enjoyed reading for a few weeks now since my interest in Spey fishing has grown!

I just bought a used combo (should arrive by end of the week) to get started and am wondering if it's correctly lined for what I want to do? If not I'll change it right off the bat.

Combo is "CND Expert 13' 8/9 two-handed rod with Reddington AS 11/12 disc drag reel, Rio 7/8 mid spey floating line (no tips)"

I've been doing some (still consider myself green at this) 8wt flyfishing for a couple years, mainly chum salmon and some coho. I've never cast a spey rod before. I want to go and enjoy the chum salmon fisher on the Squamish River and try my spey setup their:) In some reading and discussions it sounds like a shorter style line (Skagit?) is rec'd and easier for beginners like myself? One has less line off the rod tip for casting?

Any and all tips/info/suggestions most welcome. (I can make some T14 tips if this is suitable or could move to an all new spey line combo with tips)

Thanks in advance!
 

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Squamish

Type 3, 6 and 8 tips are the most used tips on the Squamish. A new line with tips in your area goes for about $180 CDN, an alternative would be to buy the three tips you need around $60 and cut the line you have to accept tips.

Welcome to the Club




Ian
 

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Using Sink Tips

The advantage of manufactured multi-tip lines is that they usually balance reasonably well. The problem I have w/ them is loosing track of the labels which results in the comingling of differing line weights and differing sinking densities. Most fishermen seem to manage multi-tip lines just fine. I'm simply defective in this arena. T-14 is great for standardizing w/ the only varible being the length. However, T-14 sinks like a rock and the difference between 10' and 4' is enough to create havoc w/ line balance. I have not worked this out yet via experience, but believe compensators, ( short looped pieces of dry line ), are in order to balance out the disparity in T-14 length/weight.
 

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Line weights

"The problem I have w/ them is loosing track of the labels which results in the comingling of differing line weights and differing sinking densities".

Thats why I like the Rio Tips, they are all color coded with the line weights marked in little squares on the loops. The large square is 5 and the small ones are 1, so if you have one large and 4 small you have a 9 wt. line. Yellow is 3, gray is 6, green is 8. I have some early lines that didn't have this and like you I was confused with what tip I had on.

Henry
 

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Also

easy to do for the individual who makes his own. I use a permanent marker to indicate the weight. Using color codes thread would make it campatible with the RIO system.

Now to rebuild some tips.
 
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