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Discussion Starter #1
So this year I just got to using my single hand 9' rod more than I used my spin rods. It's been quite a hoot catching fish with flies that I tied myself. I've also enjoyed learning all the different casting techniques.

Naturally I dug deeper into fly fishing and am now obsessed with exploring the world of two handed rods. Since I typically lean towards unique things I have had the Loop Opti Switch Style 8107 on my sights.

A couple questions. Is this rod a good starter for two handed casting? Should I be looking at something a little longer like say 12' since I already have a 9'? As for line, is starting out with OPST commando lines easy to learn with?
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the advice! I did some more reading and was coming to that conclusion and it's good to hear I'm on the right track.
 

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Yes, learn on a longer rod, not a switch length. I know sometimes the initial impulse, often manipulated by salesmen, is to try something “closer to what you are used to”, but fight that. Also maybe start with an inexpensive Echo, Reddington or the like. They are all good enough these days. Or as mentioned look for a good deal on the classifieds. Even if you know your SH fly fishing and rods, better IMHO to wait a bit and try as many things as you can. Figure out your personal tastes w/respect to spey first. Don’t worry, reading posts and classifieds here on SP will always be a cure for not spending enough money, eventually.
 

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Wanna save a bunch of money? Take a lesson or two or three with a good instructor. Ask him to bring a number of rods, he'll own a bunch. They will or should have the correct lines. You'll get a good feel for what you like by the end of day three and will have a good foundation in casting two handed rods.
 

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Wanna save a bunch of money? Take a lesson or two or three with a good instructor. Ask him to bring a number of rods, he'll own a bunch. They will or should have the correct lines. You'll get a good feel for what you like by the end of day three and will have a good foundation in casting two handed rods.
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As others have mentioned figure out what you want to do and get lessons. Stay away from short tippy rods until you figure the two handed thing out.
 

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I like what everybody said here! Great advice

Find a 13’ 7wt and a reel on the classifieds for a good deal, get a Skagit Comp line and maybe 2-3 10’ tips. Like a half/half T-11 MOW and a straight T-11 tip.

Go fish it until you feel really good at casting and by then you’ll already developed your own preferences and ideas and discoveries!

Have fun
 

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I agree with most of the advice here except the Skagit head. I would start with a scandi. It's much easier to cast and will readily show you your mistakes. From there you can go up to long lines are to skagits and sink tips.

Lessons, lessons, lessons, money well spent.

Dan
 

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Yeah get a longer rod and lessons, not necessarily in that order. I went the other way first, short rods no lessons. Cost me a lot of money learning everything the hard way and eventually gravitating to longer rods. Stubborn and stupid makes for a dedicated steelhead, salmon and permit angler though😁
Smarter people play golf...I wouldn't know I've never tried!
 
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