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In preparation for trip to the Skeena area I'm working on a bunch of ties. Last year I had the misfortune of losing 3 fish owing to failed articulated leeches. I must accept most of the blame seeing as I was the tier of these (sometimes) effective little gems. I was using Zap-A-Gap and it seemed as though the flies were seperating at the point on the front hook where the backing forming the loop for the trailing hook is cemented and tied. I have since switched to using a two part epoxy resin and kevlar thread. It seems as though Zap-A-Gap might get brittle when in cold water and put under great stress, anyone have any ideas or similar experiences. I have seen those modified "hooks" that have eyes at each end but that would be way too easy a fix. Thanks
Michael
 

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Try doubling the backing over itself at the front hook. That is, when you have attached the backing to the rear hook, lie the backing forward over the front hook and bind it down with tips still hanging over the eye. Pull those strands back, then, so they are pointing toward the bend. Squirt a little cement on, and bind down to about halfway back on the shank. (There will technically be four "strands" of backing on the hook.) Overkill? Perhaps, but they break before they slip! (Actually, I have tied leeches this way without the Zap-A-Gap and they still won't give! Be sure your thread wraps are as tight as possible!)
 

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Another way to attach the trailing hook is by running the backing through the leading hook's eye before wrapping in down with thread. This method has long been in use by New England tandum streamer tiers.

The best part is you don't need to use glue of any kind on the thread wraps tying in the backing. Almost forgot you need simply use a clinch knot to attatch the trailing hook to the backing. Do this first, and then tie the backing to the leading hook with the above described method. Very effective, nearly bullet proof, fast and easy to do.

I have used this method to catch Northern Pike of over 30 pounds when I lived in Western Montana. (Yes, illegal stocking of pike has created some pike fisheries where the pike get up to 40 to 45 pounds). Instead of backing, I used twisted wire leader. I have caught kings up to 40 pounds using flies tied this way as well.

Try it, you'll like it!
 
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