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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are we in the middle of a Paridigm Shift re two handed rods, lines & casting styles?

A paradigm is a model or exemplar. The paradigm case is the typical or archetypal case. A paradigm shift is the movement from one paradigm to another.

When I sneaked into the world of two handed casting 4 Mays ago. The common standards appeared to be big and long rods combined with the long lines that had entered the market and were coming out.

Our under 14' rods were woosie and wimpy. Rio's WC and Mid Spey lines were made for the beginning and geriatric wimps who secretely preferred the short and woosie/wimpy rods. The long lines were for the real Spey Fishers of the World, who used at least a 15' rod and a line with at least an 80' head.

The professional casters came on the stages with rods that often made a 15' rod look wimpy. The long lines they used had very long heads and filled up the biggest fly reels on the market. Big and longer were the mantras of the Spey gods and their worshipers.

So, in my second year into the Spey Kingdom, I shamefully hid my wimpy Sage 7136 and its WC 678 and MS 6/7 and 7/8 lines in my wimp rod closet. I bought a real stick, a Sage 10151 and had a custom Sage 7141 built for me. I, also, bought an ARC1409. Line wise, I bought an Accelerator, a Grand Spey and a Cannon to go with my big rod arsenal.

The Sage 10151 and Accelerator and I never got along :mad: , and my son has that combo as an early inheritance.

I did enjoy casting the ARC 1409 and on days when I felt masochistic :devil: , the 7141 was perfect. Even these two shorter rods than the 10151 were too much rod for the waters I live near and fish (N. California and SW Oregon). So they didn't get used much in late spring, summer and early fall with the lower water levels. When I used them I used the long lines.

Later that winter I realized that my virgin year with my woosie 7136 had been a very productive year fishing. The long rods and lines moved me more into casting versus fishing. The actual catching of fish was about non existent my second year with the "Real and non Woosie" Rods and lines.

Next, I sold my ARC 1409 and closeted my 7141, and in May I bought a Sage 6126-3 after a lot of reading, research and discussion. I dug out my old woosie/wimpy WC 678 and MS lines out of my Woosie closet. They worked great and with minimal casting effort. Suddenly, I was back to fishing, catching fish and enjoying the two handed rod adventure again.

I discovered that the "little" 6126-3 with my old WC 678 and MS 6/7 and 7/8 were all the rod and line that I needed for most of my fishing waters. Also, I was less fatigued and happier at the end of a day fishing than with the longer rods and lines. The one downside of the 6126-3 was that it over whelmed any fish 3 pounds or under. Also, it was a little too much rod for some of my rivers and streams during the low water months.

Last year I bought a Sage 5120 for the smaller streams, low water months, small fish and not to reinjure my recently torn bicep and bicep head. Also, last year the Skagit lines came out and fishing became even more fun and easier on an old Grampa. :chuckle: The Skagit 450 worked great with my 6126 and 5120. Chris Andersen of Sage suggested that I try a floating tip with the Skagit 450, and that worked very well with both the 6126 and 5120.

This year, thanks to Rick J, I tried the Rio Outbound 10wt Floater with my 5120, and the OB is easier for me to cast that my Skagit 450 with the 5120. It also works well with my Meiser 5/6 Switch rod as Bob Pauli and I found out this Thursday.

This past Thursday Bob Pauli and I spent the day on the Russian River north of Healdsburg. Bob and I cast my shorter.lighter rods in the afternoon. Even though the river was running about double the normal flows in May and triple the flows in summer, we were able to reach out and touch the other side with minimal wading. I didn't have my waders and wading boots on, a pair of Aqua socks and a pair of Crocs enabled me to wade out in 6 inch water and cover the river with the Meiser 5/6 Switch Rod and Sage 5120 and 6126-3 with a Skagit 450 or the OB 10 weight floating line. The 6126-3 handled a 12' type 8 sinking leader/tip, a couple of feet of tippertand :Eyecrazy: a very big intruder fly with zero problems and miminal effort or large skating flies.

When you don't have to wade very much to fish, you are in less danger and strain through out the day. This makes for a happier Grampa at the end of the day with less wading. Less deep wading is an advantage of all long rods versus the shorter one handed rods.

When you use light rods to cover close water, the deep water in the middle to the water on the opposite shore with minimal effort in casting, you feel better at the end of the day.

This past Tuesday and Thursday, I spent at least 8+ hours per day casting these lighter rods with the Skagit and OB lines. The next days, I had minimal if any aches or sore spots.

This is not posted to throw rocks at long rods, lines and the classic casting styles. If I lived someplace where they could be used regularily like Scotland or the PNW, I would probably use them. However, I live and fish where they are not necessary and often are a nuisance or a huge disadvantage versus the shorter/lighter/smaller rods and lines. The Skagit lines may be heavier, but they require very little energy in casting them. That is a great combo: :D Casting an easy to cast Skagit with an easy to use and cast, short and light rod.

In closing, I doubt if I am the only one :saevilw: in a Paradigm Shift re the shorter and lighter two handed rods, Skagit/OB lines and casting styles.;)
 

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............Dave,I've got rods from 11' to 16'. I cast what I feel like that day,they go from a 7wt to a 12wt. They'll all cast,at minumum, a 15' type 8 tip...and some of them a lot more. It sounds like you've found what works for you where you fish,and what you like to cast. That's a good thing,it doesn't matter what works for someone else,only what works for you. As you noted,it makes it a lot more fun!!:hihi:
 

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Or....

Maybe you are just getting old, Grampa. Not that doing so is bad. You seem to be getting wiser as well.

Could it be that those big sticks and long-belly lines are best suited to the young bucks?

Please don't be offended. As they say, "It takes one to know one."
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You have decoded the great mystery of the right rod for the day

spey machine said:
............Dave, I've got rods from 11' to 16'. I cast what I feel like that day,they go from a 7wt to a 12wt. They'll all cast,at minumum, a 15' type 8 tip...and some of them a lot more. It sounds like you've found what works for you where you fish,and what you like to cast. That's a good thing,it doesn't matter what works for someone else,only what works for you. As you noted,it makes it a lot more fun!!:hihi:
Excellent summation. I have found what works for me, where I fish, and what I like to cast. It is a good thing, and it is a lot more fun :chuckle: .
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm not offended at all. You are correct.

"Maybe you are just getting old, Grampa. Not that doing so is bad. You seem to be getting wiser as well."

Getting a little wiser as we age, probably should be a goal for all of us as we age.

"Could it be that those big sticks and long-belly lines are best suited to the young bucks?"

I think that you have nailed this. There are exceptions like Bob Pauli, who is a couple of years younger than I am. Bob prefers the big long and stiff rods. He does a great job with them and loves to push the grain weight with his Skagit lines and the tips. Bob is also, several inches taller than I am, in better shape and is a much better athlete.

"Please don't be offended. As they say, "It takes one to know one."

As I noted in the subject line of this reply. I'm not offended. You have cited the reality of the two handed rods with me.

I am a couple of years older than the older Boomers. The Boomers fill up the doctors's offices, physical therapists offices and sometimes the Orthopedic surgeons's offices as they refuse to realize that they are older and can't do things they loved to do in the same manner.

My wife is the head office nurse for a very busy Family Practice Doctor, who is in the age of the first Boomers. Aging has been tough for him until the wisdom set in. When a Boomer comes in with an injury from something they have been doing, this excellent doctor will isolate the injury and ask the patient to show him what caused the injury or to tell him what caused it.

He wants them to visual what caused the injury and the pain. After they describe the action, he has a reply that angers them at first, "Don't do that anymore, or you will hurt yourself even more!"

If they insist that they want to do what caused the pain, he refers them to a Physical Therapist and or/an Orthopedic Surgeon. He tells them to go to these referral people and listen to them and work with them. If they tell them, not to do X anymore, he then tells them, they need a new hobby or work.

Thanks again!
 
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