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PiscatorNonSolumPiscatur
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Many good points here, but long line casters I know don't wade deep as that is a benefit of casting long, specially when you get older and don't want to wade deep.
And, of course there is the enjoyment factor as many of us seek out the big wide runs so we can cast longer. So it's also about what experience you are looking for.
 

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Certainly a eye opener for myself.I thought folks pushing back about executing long cast was something that was a sticking point in the single hand rod forums. Anyone taking up the two hander wasnt going to have any issues with folks poking out a long cast. Regardless if it’s a fishing tactic or just for fun!
 

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Yup, not one relevant reply in the last several posts since Farnkvena’s post, but fun to read nevertheless.
I might as well muddy the waters too, and suggest a long cast at 90 degrees across is quite different than a long fine and far cast down and across. My experience is 90 degree long casts are set up casts, generally used to allow the fly to drop in the water column, not to cover more water across the river (there are exceptions of course, and I often cast to the far bank at 90 degrees, to allow depth, mending, etc. and to cover a small seam or bucket farther out). Far and fine down stream casts are used to begin fishing soon after the fly lands and cover as much water on the far side as possible.
I have no idea if a long cast or a short cast covers more river over the course of a day. My experience is that is not the right question or really relevant. We are hunters. If the fish are spread out across the river, then cast long and cover as much of the width of the river as possible. If the fish are in specific buckets or sides, or if you cannot effectively cast and present the fly with a longer cast, then cast shorter and cover more runs throughout the day.
 

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Single hand and double hand fly rods mostly from Beulah and Hardy
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On a full days fishing there is just to many variables to consider. But, if you limited it to one run with no break times then I would say the person casting the longer line covered more water assuming that both casters stepped down an equal amount of distance after each cast, each person took the same number of casts and assuming neither angler caught any fish.:)

Otherwise:
How many casts were taken?
What is the average distance of the step down?
How many breaks were taken by each person for changing flies, eating, drinking, smoking, biological functions, etc.
How long was the average break time?
How many runs were covered by each caster?
Was travel between runs done on foot, by car, by boat?
more....
 

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BULL DOG!!!!
Gaelforce
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2,716 Posts
On a full days fishing there is just to many variables to consider. But, if you limited it to one run with no break times then I would say the person casting the longer line covered more water assuming that both casters stepped down an equal amount of distance after each cast, each person took the same number of casts and assuming neither angler caught any fish.:)

Otherwise:
How many casts were taken?
What is the average distance of the step down?
How many breaks were taken by each person for changing flies, eating, drinking, smoking, biological functions, etc.
How long was the average break time?
How many runs were covered by each caster?
Was travel between runs done on foot, by car, by boat?
more....
You could also add that if casting short are you casting 90 degrees or down and across and same said for long…..
overall however…. yes casting long will cover more water if you are competent at doing so.
so it is not irrelevant
 

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Stephen
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181 Posts
...if I could consistently cast 100 to 120 feet AND Properly present my fly AND control it throughout the swing relative to speed and depth AND control this with the right mend I would. However I try to cast within my true capabilities and ensure that my presentation is its best. I've gathered from this forum over time that presentation is everything.
 

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fly on little wing
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During a day of fishing does a series of long casts cover more water than a series of shorter casts?
hi Bob, yes. big water and big runs, longer casts will cover more water than short casts. and no, long casts are not over rated.
 

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I've never seen someone who could cast far not be able to cast short. But I have seen the other way around plenty.

As it pertains to the original question, I'd say it's a moot point because the anglers that cover the most water and fish are the ones that don't dick around and waste effort, regardless of cast length. The don't throw tailing loops. Almost all their casts turn over completely. They never waste time with multiple casts from the same spot. They don't take 3-inch steps down the river and spend half a day in one run. They don't fish 20' of t-17 and lose and tie on 3 dozen flies a day. They know how to read water and don't waste time in anything that doesn't hold fish. They are machines.

Of course, it's supposed to be fun and there's too few fish left to make a contest out of it. So fish hard when you want to fish hard. Dick around when you want to dick around. And if you want to measure up, come to SOR and leave the fish out of it.
 

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I think to a certain extent long casting can have a correlation with more fish encounters, simply covering more water with each swing. BUT, angle of the swing, swing speed, wading shallow, positive turnover of the leader and fly along with knowing where fish typically lie will outweigh casting distance anyday in my book. Lots of fish lie close which can be casted over (kinda weird to think) or harassed wading too deep or botched casting.
 

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Broken Down Spey Freak
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Not sure where the idea that as a long line/distance caster wades deep, crashes anchors or cast over fish comes from. The fact is cast, swing, step, just like everybody else. I'm just casting further down river once I've worked the line out. If I can cover upto 150feet down stream and say 60 feet out from the bank without moving my feet why wouldn't I. At that point I start to step down. I'd say that's covering water. If I was only casting 40-60 feet all day I wouldn't need a two hander. A single hand 8wt would work just fine. I absolutely avoid wading deep if at all possible and don't even step into the river if I don't have to. I would think a typical skagit cast would make more noise than a snake or single Spey ever will. If you are crashing anchors then you need some practice.
I think the question has been answered several times and in a few different ways. As always, it depends.
 

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BULL DOG!!!!
Gaelforce
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2,716 Posts
I've never seen someone who could cast far not be able to cast short. But I have seen the other way around plenty.

As it pertains to the original question, I'd say it's a moot point because the anglers that cover the most water and fish are the ones that don't dick around and waste effort, regardless of cast length. The don't throw tailing loops. Almost all their casts turn over completely. They never waste time with multiple casts from the same spot. They don't take 3-inch steps down the river and spend half a day in one run. They don't fish 20' of t-17 and lose and tie on 3 dozen flies a day. They know how to read water and don't waste time in anything that doesn't hold fish. They are machines.

Of course, it's supposed to be fun and there's too few fish left to make a contest out of it. So fish hard when you want to fish hard. Dick around when you want to dick around. And if you want to measure up, come to SOR and leave the fish out of it.
Amen 🙌
 

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Not sure where the idea that as a long line/distance caster wades deep, crashes anchors or cast over fish comes from. The fact is cast, swing, step, just like everybody else. I'm just casting further down river once I've worked the line out. If I can cover upto 150feet down stream and say 60 feet out from the bank without moving my feet why wouldn't I. At that point I start to step down. I'd say that's covering water. If I was only casting 40-60 feet all day I wouldn't need a two hander. A single hand 8wt would work just fine. I absolutely avoid wading deep if at all possible and don't even step into the river if I don't have to. I would think a typical skagit cast would make more noise than a snake or single Spey ever will. If you are crashing anchors then you need some practice.
I think the question has been answered several times and in a few different ways. As always, it depends.

There was once a jedi that claimed that the white mouse of a long belly line would scare the fish.

I'm almost positive his jet sled never did :rolleyes:
 

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Hello,
regarding the simple hypothesis of water covering, long cast cover more water than the shorter one at least on the mathematical point of vue. But maybe the most important effect is the way of fishing and the line used. If we fish with a long part of floating line on the water and a heavy tip it’s very difficult to conduct the line because the eddy and the different currents. It’s also very difficult to feel the take of a fish vs a short line. So maybe we can find a middle way in using different 3D full sinking line and long double handed (14ft and up) and cast far. This could improve our fishing in covering more water and fly presentation at the same time.
But, this idea seems to be better for wet fly fishing. It depend on the season and the water conditions, more the current speed increase more we have to fish close to the bank or reach the bottom. And the reverse for lower conditions.
I agree with the no deep wading in all case.

I end with another question :
Please what do you think about 3D line?
 
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