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Internet Scientist
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The calculation of the fly speed will be the most difficult without knowledge of it's drag in the water. Or I guess that could stay a variable... thinking...

Did you generate any empirical data for the two casting lengths? That might be the best way to do this as actual fishing technique could be included (which should vary over the different casting distances - e.g. swing speed as mentioned). Otherwise, a series of integrals will be the end state with additional variable definitions required. Maybe parametric integrals.
 

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SSpey
Some good points. Last week on the Dean River above the canyon we fished at least 3 runs where velocity of flow is essentially equal from bank to bank. We wondered about water coverage in a day of all 80’ casts vs. all 60’ casts. We chose 60’ feet because it is the distance to a fly when casting a long Skagit (29’)+ 15’ sink tip +
6’ leader + 15’ rod = 65’. Deduct 5’ for rebound, mending, line wiggles = 60’ without shooting line. We arbitrarily defined a long cast as 80’.
But where’d you find the fish
 

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During a day of fishing does a series of long casts cover more water than a series of shorter casts?
I would think the engineers, scientists, and math folks might be best to answer this question strictly. Do you cover more water across the river versus covering more water by moving down runs faster with shorter casts? Not sure.

Expanding the question some might lead to a different answer depending on the water and where the fish will rest or hold in a particular run. If spread out across the river, then maybe more water with fish in can be covered with longer casts. If fish are concentrated or tend to hold on the near side, then working shorter casts but covering more river mile.

I do both depending on the run and/or river.
 

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Rectangle Slope Plot Font Line


Swing arcs were drawn using a protractor.

For the sake of argument let's assume that the current is absolutely even from bank to bank. Caster "A" starts at his 1st position and casts 90 degrees across the current - a 40' cast, and the fly swings in a perfect circular arc to the dangle (I know this is not real world but it is empirical 😜). It takes caster "A" 9 casts/steps to reach the final dangle at the tailout. Caster "B" starts at his 1st position and casts at a 45 degree angle with a 56.5' cast that reaches caster "A"'s target position on what was his final cast (this way they end up with their respective first casts ending at the same spot on the dangle). It takes caster "B" 10 casts/steps to reach the exact same final fly position on the dangle. You can see from the diagram that caster "A" covers a little more water on the far bank at the beginning that caster "B" misses due to his cast angle and that caster "B" covers a little more water on the far bank at the end - pretty much an even amount for each caster. However, the key here is that it takes caster "B" one extra cast to reach the same end point as caster "A"

Let's assume that each step is ~3' (as Marty Howard says "The length of one good Steelhead"). Is this significant? If caster "B" took one less cast/step to match the number of casts/steps of caster "A" would he miss showing his fly to a fish that Caster "A" might?

Based on the number of casts made by each caster to cover the same amount of water (same amount of water covered but slightly different parts of the river were covered) then caster "A" is able to move to the next run in one less cast than caster "B" giving him a slight edge in amount of water covered in a day.

Again, as we all know this is not real world as many factors will affect each casters cast/swing, but as an empirical thought experiment it tells you a little something about the difference between shorter and longer casts - all else being equal.
 

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BULL DOG!!!!
Gaelforce
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I think Bob you might look at rephrasing the question to something like is casting far unnecessary on private or pay for play rivers where you are usually the first or second person through a pool vs necessary for public waters especially big ones where you might be the 20th person through a pool that’s been pounded and the fish moved way out. Real life is just a little bit different than ideal situations
 

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Long casters create their own narrative as they move down a river—-they wade deep, thrash the river with their line-anchors, then throw world record casts with their line.

Because they wade deep, thrash the river with their line-anchors, and throw world record casts with their line, when they do hook a fish using that technique they will argue that’s the technique everybody should use to catch fish because it worked for them.

Meanwhile, the fish they hooked was the same fish that was laying in the shallows when they first stepped into the river but now got pushed out into deeper/faster holding water because of the deep wading/water-thrashing behavior of the world record caster.

I steer clear of those guys. I’ll go find quieter wafter and stick to short casts in undisturbed water. That has worked extremely well for me for 4 decades now

The real score keeping on those techniques is not measured so much by the number of fish each separate technique can file in their memory cabinet.

It‘s who will still be able to fish without pain or the need for cortisone shots in their shoulders as they advance in age.

I don't know where you fish but I know of zero longline casters that wade beyound their ankles, as there is no need to wade deep and they all start with short casts to work the near water first!
Maybe you should take a leason and learn how to cast without without inducing pain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
I think Bob you might look at rephrasing the question to something like is casting far unnecessary on private or pay for play rivers where you are usually the first or second person through a pool vs necessary for public waters especially big ones where you might be the 20th person through a pool that’s been pounded and the fish moved way out. Real life is just a little bit different than ideal situations
Bruce,
You may be jumping ahead. Respectfully, I am trying to learn in a linear fashion by understanding the opinion of experienced members of this board to narrowly framed questions. There are many variables that I wish to explore with this group and ask your patience. As a mechanical engineer this is my process.
Bob
 

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BULL DOG!!!!
Gaelforce
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Bruce,
You may be jumping ahead. Respectfully, I am trying to learn in a linear fashion by understanding the opinion of experienced members of this board to narrowly framed questions. There are many variables that I wish to explore with this group and ask your patience. As a mechanical engineer this is my process.
Bob
I work with engineers every day that’s my problem 🤣🤣🤣
 
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