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That is a MKII St. John.
The earlier ones can be converted to LHW by turning the pawl over.
Here is a Hindiminium St John set up for RHW. By placing the pawl with the slot facing down and to your right (it's facing left, hard to see though) you'll make it LHW.
 

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Is that the Mark II, FishOn?
Yes Sir, it's a stock photo of a MK II. The small-arbor spool has just the capacity for up to 6/7 full-on spey lines over 150 yards of #30 standard backing.

Mine is stamped St. John 3 7/8" - is single pawl, with spares, and is not reversible - makes little sense to me because it is a great 7/8/9 reel for a single hander when majority would cast right handed...
 

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Keith,
PM sent Tuesday evening.
 

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Hello.. Once more, to put things right. That is NOT a Mk. II, it is a Mk. 2 fishon4evr.. blue dun shows a Mk.II on his photo.. Yours borano20
 

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Here is a photo of the back of the reel. It is NOT a Mk. II but a post WWII Hindiminium St. John.
The 1965 Hardy catalogue states "Fitted with regulating patent 'Compensating' check, with duplicates pares, and Hardy's original latch."
The 1976 catalogue states "Fitted with compensating check with duplicating spares. StateMk. II for spare parts."
Having had both models at one time the spools are not interchangeable as the cog wheel on the Mk. II is smaller so when a Mk. II spool is put on an earlier model the pawl barely makes contact with the cog wheel and the older one will not go all the way on as the pawl stops the spool from going all the way on.
 

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I stand corrected. The reel I posted is stamped MK 2, is truly reversible and looks like:
1369384069.jpg

As far as I can tell MK II means a stronger set of check-components than those used on earlier reels. Those reels with the heavier components are not stamped MK II.
 

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I stand corrected. The reel I posted is stamped MK 2, is truly reversible and looks like:
View attachment 104313

As far as I can tell MK II means a stronger set of check-components than those used on earlier reels. Those reels with the heavier components are not stamped MK II.
Hello.. Ahem, Mk. II only means that parts were interchangable, standardized.. Mk. I´s were not. Construction is, however, the same. Mk. II was introduced in 1923, as a matter of fact, the same year as the St. John reel, discussed in this thread.. Yours borano20
 

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Hello borano20 - There are too many Hardy reels identified as having "Duplicated" MK I checks that have a single engaging-pawl (without spares) and mechanism that are obviously lighter, and many others with spares identified as MK II with noticeably heavier mechanisms. To me - that suggest that the MK I is a lighter mechanism than the MKII, each with standardized parts. Conversely - there are also many reels with spares which are identified as "Duplicated" MK II. Obviously you are the expert here and have sorted through all of that. Hope that your throat feels better BTW.

To the OP - I would suggest that if a convertible reel is what you are after then look for a MK 2 as those are the truly LH/RH. Or maybe one of those rare St. John LHW reels.

Cheers,
Vic.
 

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Hello.. Interesting thoughts here. Let me tell you what I have on my desk: Blacklead 3 1/4" Wide Perfect, VERY fine mechanism, trout style. No spares. Reel stamped Mk. II. COULD be a wartime (no spares) reel, or a special. St. George 3 3/4", large arbour reel. Reel has no Mk. , or size stamps. Check is of same construction and same size as in the Perfect, but has stronger springs. Complete with spares, in the Mk. II position (opposite). Inside stamp is only "L", indicating early production. I would expect this reel to have a ivorine (white) handle, but is black. Handle is a replacement?? Don´t think so, there are turning marks in the largearbour spool, and marks on the spool and on the inside end of the handle shaft match each other. Maybe St. George reels were always fitted with spares?? One 3 7/8" Narrow Perfect has a strongish check, but a very small handle. Another has a troutsized check, but a "Zenith-sized" handle. Both have MK. II stamps, identical to each other.. Both are blacklead finish.. Can you really tell anything for sure?? Yours borano20
 
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