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That Guy in PEI.....
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys.
I watched the clip on the circle cast and i have a few questions. Here goes, is this cast performed when the fly is on the dangle? The video shows the cast being picked up almost cross current from the caster and nowhere near the end of the swing. Judging by the video is this cast a substitute for a right hand caster who doesnt want to switch hands(left hand on top) to perform a double spey? Thanks for your help lads.
Salmon Chaser
><)))*>
 

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chrome-magnon man
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The circle is used as a replacement for the single spey and is normally made beginning with the fly on the dangle. When I filmed that clip the lighting was such that I needed to adjust the point of the initial lift. However, as you can see you can aim the circle cast at a very shallow angle if you want, or as wide an angle as you please. Point the centerline of your body at your target, then make the circle ending up so that your top hand is at belt level and pointing at your target, then form your D loop and cast.
 

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Hi Dana,
Curious about your description. I generally use more of a snap T/C rather than a circle cast but you menion that your hand should be pointing at the target at the end of the circle. I have always ended pointing the rod back downstream rather than at the target. Reasons for not doing this? Is the circle different than the snap T in this regard for some reason?

Best regards,
Rick J
 

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chrome-magnon man
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Howdy Rick!

Many casters new to these casts add too much "oomph" and pull the line too far back downstream again, or not enough and land the line too far upstream. Teaching that the top hand ends up pointing at the target in both casts (circle and snap) tends to correct these problems.
 

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circle

One thing I have noticed about the circle is that you can specify exactly where your anchor lands by where you end your circle. If you want the anchor to land further downstream, just make your circle end more downstream, sometimes even in towards shore a bit by crossing your arms. If you want the anchor to land further upstream, make your circle end further upstream. In that case my hand would be more pointed towards the target. More often than not, I cast with my anchor really close to me so I prefer to follow through more on the circle. It also tends to give me a better "lay down" after the circle so my white mouse is more uniform.

I have noticed a tendency for many people to not follow through the circle and therefore place their anchor too far upstream, resulting in a Bloody L type of situation. Following through on the circle brings the anchor closer to the body where it can be more easily pivoted.

I believe the circle is one of the easiest casts to teach because the anchor can be controlled so easily. Regardless of the speed of the circle, the anchor can be controlled by where you finish the circle. The single and double spey rely on the speed of the sweep to determine where you throw the anchor. And its easier to teach movement locations than it is to teach speed or feel.

FWIW -- I'm a windcutter (and shorter) guy.
 

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That Guy in PEI.....
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the clarification Dana.
Salmon Chaser
><)))*>
 
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