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Hooked4life
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Discussion Starter #1
It's often assumed that we need specialized gear for single hand Spey casting, but the reality is, any fly rod with it's correct AFTMA line can Spey cast.

Here's a little demo using a 3 wt. rod and a regular 3 wt. fly line.

https://youtu.be/FRUiubZCN0w
 

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FISHIN' FREELANCER
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Nice clip Peter. Simple, practical, and effective.. with gear that's already on hand.

Enjoyed hearing the birds, many are just now returning here.
 

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I was doing single hand spey casts as a teenager years before I knew there was such a thing as spey casting.

Everything about fly fishing becomes intuitive after a few years of doing it. The constant need for making long castss with no back cast room will lead people to spey casting....

One thing I want to do is test my theory that a single hand spey cast with a haul will out preform a two handed cast with the same rod.


i guess that was my long way of saying that single hand spey casting is very cool :)
 

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I was doing single hand spey casts as a teenager years before I knew there was such a thing as spey casting.

Everything about fly fishing becomes intuitive after a few years of doing it. The constant need for making long castss with no back cast room will lead people to spey casting....

One thing I want to do is test my theory that a single hand spey cast with a haul will out preform a two handed cast with the same rod.


i guess that was my long way of saying that single hand spey casting is very cool :)
Thanks for posting the video Peter, reminds us of the usefulness of single hand spey casting using gear we already have on hand.

I totally agree Rob, single hand spey casting is very cool! I've been having so much fun with single hand spey casting since I seriously got into it in 2011 with glass rods and Ambush lines.

My current experiments that I spoke of under my post on uplining single handers for spey casting has afforded me with pleasurable casting setups with my trout rods. For my particular style, uplining 2 line weights has been working very well and currently, my favorite is my old Loomis GLX 9'5wt with 7wt SA Bass bug taper.

It's all in good fun and personal discovery. Like Rob, I put hauls into my "backcasts" and forward casts - "turbo spey casting" and this really helps to add power and distance to the single hand spey casts I've been using, both waterbourne and touch and go.

Todd
 

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single handed spey casting

A question for the double haulers. I realize the advantage on the forward haul. But when trying to use it on the back haul other than picking up a very long or sunken line I don't get the same bang for my buck, like the forward haul. Normally I spey because of obstructions and am not looking for a large D. Am I missing something. In overhead casting I know the value in the back haul ,am I wanting to generate more line speed on a sustained anchor. Just a friendly question with an open mind. I generally spey with only the forward haul, Thanks for your reply slack
 

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Hooked4life
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Discussion Starter #8
When single hand Spey casting, I only haul going forward. Don't see much point for the rearward haul going into the D-Loop.

However, when fishing streamers, I often strip the head well into the guides, which then requires it to be worked back out for the Spey cast. To do that I slip line into the set and the backcast of the Double or Circle. With the Single, I just slip line into the backcast.

That slipping of line works just like slipping line into the backcast of an overhead cast. The line has a rearward momentum that we can use to pre-load the rod as we start to go forward.

When fishing on the beach, I'll use a Spey cast setup for an overhead cast. The forward cast from these Spey cast setups have to be gentle as I just need the head out with a bit of overhang. With these setup Spey casts, I have to slip line into the D-Loop as the end of the head starts out in my hands.

On occasion I lose my grip on running line during the forward stroke of the setup Spey cast and the line will sail out over 60' despite my gentle application of power. To a significant degree, that distance is due to the rod pre-load imparted by the line slip. I can feel that pre-load in the rod when I start the forward stroke.
 

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I use the "back haul" for a few reasons, first and foremost being efficiency. I find the higher line speed generated by the haul loads the rod more effectively with less arm motion that without. As a bonus, the higher line speed lends itself well to highly energized V-loop formation, allowing for an entire 46' head to be t&g cast from a 9' rod with a minimum of effort.

As an aside, I don't cast a singlehander rod WITHOUT hauling, regardless of rod size or distance needed - I find it to be an incredibly efficient way to generate line speed with a minimum of actual arm movement, and I'm as lazy as they come.
 

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Slack -
Im double haulin' because I don't cast single handers nearly as well without and as far as anchored casts go - having learned fly casting with double handled/two handed rods (whichever) - the haul for all practical purposes is taking place of the bottom handle. I use it anywhere I would use bottom-hand emphasis on long rods, so only after the line has already been lifted. I don't feel a haul does anything to bring a deeply sunk line to the surface nor to the lift in the same way lower corks would "two handed."
 

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G Smolt and fish4ever I am a serious hauler with a single hander with over hand casting and realize all the benefits. I have Simons Book on SH Spey Casting and spent a lot of time working on his turbo cast. If it works for you guys maybe I need to go back to the drawing board. I use just standard lines, sometimes I up line by one. Half of the casts are Speys and I haul all FW casts. I will work on the back hauls as I say if its working that well for you I will stay with it. Thanks for the encouragement. slack














astingSH rodsS
 

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I'm with GSmolt on using the haul on the back cast/D-loop formation and forward cast with single handers. And I also use double hauled single hand spey casts pretty much full time. For me, when using single handers, which are generally quite a bit shorter than most switches and two handers, the hauls afford more power and efficiency with greater line speed to cut wind. I actually find that I am able to put the most power into hauled backcasts on waterborne casts like the snap T, double spey, and perry pokes. I also put the haul into single speys, but there are times where weird wind directions makes setting up the single spey consistently can be tough, that's when I "cheat" and put a hauled snap t into place to get the line out.

Todd
 

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Hooked4life
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Discussion Starter #14
Interested in understanding your fishing situation where the haul into the D-Loop is needed.

Single hand Spey for me is strictly a limited backcast thing. Using either a short line when really tight or a longer line when there's a bit more room, but always where an overhead cast won't easily work. I know about bow & arrow or steeple casts as options, but prefer a Spey cast.

If there's room for overhead, I go overhead.
 

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Interested in understanding your fishing situation where the haul into the D-Loop is needed.

Single hand Spey for me is strictly a limited backcast thing. Using either a short line when really tight or a longer line when there's a bit more room, but always where an overhead cast won't easily work. I know about bow & arrow or steeple casts as options, but prefer a Spey cast.

If there's room for overhead, I go overhead.
I was out today with an Ambush 7WF in close quarters - no room for a back cast overhead with more than a few feet over hang and shooting out to roughly 50 feet. Im making controlled stripped/twitched retrieves right up to the back taper. Im tucked in so tight that lifting rod too high or sweeping too wide for a set-up and tip will hit obstructions. When setting up the anchor, a haul will bring it in close without having to extend nearly as much. The haul isn't as pronounced going into the D loop as the forward cast, but Im deliberate in doing it.
 

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I use the haul on the backcast all the time whether in close or when I have more room. Like Fishon talked about, with the Ambush in tight quarters, a short compact haul helps load the rod without extending too far behind and getting caught on obstructions. Lately with my trout rods and standard weight forwards and bass bug tapers, they feel like "long bellies", compared to the Ambush! Again, in tight quarters a compact haul loads the rod with less back extension on the back cast. When I have more room, I still enjoy using spey casts and use longer stroke and bigger hauls, back and forward.

Anymore, I tend to use spey casts 95% of the time with my single handers, even when I have room for overhead casting. Ever since I've learned to spey cast with my single handers I've been having so much fun that overhead casting has lost it's appeal.

Todd
 

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single hand spey casting

Just a quick question for all who Participated? Do you think you are as accurate with the Spey as the OH cast? I know I am not but that doesn't mean others are not! Thanks slack
 

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Hooked4life
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Discussion Starter #19
To a large degree yes, but I think my line choices have a lot to do with it. When out fishing for trout, I'm using my regular trout lines - no over-lining - so there's no real difference in feel between the casting types. As long as we track straight, the cast is accurate.

Haven't checked this, but I'm guessing that when we use a very heavy, short head setup, then tracking can be a problem. Without straight tracking, accuracy is wishful thinking.

I don't use super heavy setups for single hand Spey. The heaviest I'll go is the rated weight of the rod in a 40+ line. That combo lets me Spey cast for distance and still be reasonably accurate.
 

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Just a quick question for all who Participated? Do you think you are as accurate with the Spey as the OH cast? I know I am not but that doesn't mean others are not! Thanks slack
I think I'm just as accurate with single-handed spey casts (or two-handed for that matter) as I can be with overhand casts. For me, I just have to get the feel for the line and then I'm good to go. I was out a few evenings ago fishing an Elk Hair Caddis to rising trout using my 5wt SH rod lined with a Scientific Anglers VPT line. I felt like I was able to drop the fly exactly where I wanted it, most of the time. I was moving back and forth between overhand and spey casts.

I also use an Airflo Skagit Switch on my SH 8wt from time to time, I don't feel like my accuracy is degraded with this setup either.

That being said, I do fish a lot and most of my fishing in this area is pretty technical, casting to specific spots along structure/wood.

-Matt
 
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