Spey Pages banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Swinger of Flies
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I hope I am not crossing any lines or asking an innapropriate question here (if I am, please square me away)

For all the Guides in the crew, how did you get started?

I have been doing a great deal of inquiring and most every outfitter that I talk to says they only hire guides that have already been guides for a while. In that, is the only way for someone to hire on as a guide is to have their own operation and then go from there?

I am thinking, if they only hire experienced guides....then how does one get the experience to be a guide, if they only hire experienced guides?

Dumb question, I know...sorry about that. But this has me stumped. Thanks in advance. jay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Guide School

Jay,
Somewhere in my reading brochures of places that I will never fish, some outfitters give guide schools. I believe it was in Idaho. It doesn't have to be expensive ($99 each way/Southwest Airline to Salt Lake City/ rental car $200/week; 3 hrs to Yellowstone). Good Luck. Free guiding counts as experience. I'm available. (just kidding). But on your own and working with some of the TU chapters giving free local talks helps get business. We get many guides in to our TU chapter for talks.
Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,297 Posts
here

in oregon,you have to be a separate `entity',,like someone who works on your house,,it's all about insurance coverage,,,and,,,on the Rogue,,,they insure the boat hull,,,like driving a car,cpr/first aid certification,then you have dif. sections=permits=costs,and if a motor is used you need a coast guard license,,,plus a good tongue,,,,since you'll be biting it alot :rolleyes:
 

·
Junkyard Spey
Joined
·
7,112 Posts
Hey Jay...

some outfitters give guide schools. I believe it was in Idaho.

If you want this info I can send it to you.
 

·
Damn fish ladder
Joined
·
199 Posts
My buddies did guide school

My two good friends did guide school (not sure which one) and are now guides for Madison River Outfitters in Ennis, MT.

BA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
First off madison River Outfitters (MRO) is in West Yellowstone
Madison River Fishing Company ( MRFC) is in Ennis

Here in Washington State all that is required to be a guide is a 180 dollar license. Which is as it should be!! once guide and outfitter organizations start taking overthen weird things begin to happen.
At any rate one should become a guide after they have become familiar with the fishery in which they want to guide... decide where you want to live.. move there learn the fisheries then become a guide..
thats just my opinion
 

·
Swinger of Flies
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Right on, Thanks for all the responses. Good info.

MJC, I am interested in taking a look at that information you mentioned. Shoot me an email.

I did manage to find one operation in Alaska that has a guide / trainee deal. I sent off to them, but havent heard anything back. The plus side to them is a regular paycheck.

As for finding the place I want to live and going from there, I already did that - western washington. I'd go to montana or Idaho for a summer....hell I've been fishing those waters in idaho since I was a kid.

Once I get back from Iraqi-land, I am going to start working on the certifications. With some refinements and polishing, I will be ready to go for the single hander. It might take alot of work for the double hander test, but what the hell - Thats good training.

Well, Thanks again for all the responses. Tight Lines! Jay
 

·
Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
Good luck Jay, get home safe. Any way I can help let me know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,297 Posts
better shoot us

an e-mail to one of the moderaters at least every so often,,so's we'll know how the bite is :wink: ,,,fish for fun when you can,where you can,every chance you get :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
Based on what I did...

First, you should fish and know your water so well that you're in regular conversation with working guides in your area. If you're avid enough to be a guide, I'm sure you've talked with many and probably 'fun-fished' (as opposed to client-fished) with some of them. Let them know of your interest and listen closely to their suggestions.

Second, take friends and acquaintances fishing and practice guiding on an unpaid basis. You don't have to be a licensed guide to take a friend fishing, even if it's a friend-of-a-friend. Just make darn sure that there is no misrepresentation and that no money, etc. changes hands if you're not insured. You assume a higher level of liability once it goes past just going fishing together.

It takes much more than fishing knowledge to be a good guide. It's about people skills and making the experience enjoyable for the client. What that enjoyment means isn't the same to everyone. Make very sure that you like teaching, and are patient and personable.

Third, get your credentials and legal stuff straight. In Michigan there is a licensing test, and you need insurance. Talk with experienced, successful guides, and it's much better if you can get one of them to take you under his/her wing.

Fourth, adding to that last point, get started by getting experienced guides to take you on as an extra boat on multi-boat trips (once you've got #3 straight). That's how I started. You get the benefit of being able to compare notes with the experienced guide(s) at the end of the day. If you do well, you'll get more chances. If you can become real friends with a high quality, experienced guide, you can learn a great deal.
Hope that helps.
Carl
 

·
Indicators Anonymous
Joined
·
846 Posts
Be qualified. IMHO, there are way too many guides out there guiding water they don't know, guiding for fish they understand etc. etc. etc. There are just too many guides out there in general.

However, eventhough there is complete saturation of guides around (I'm speaking of Wa. state) there are few who I would consider 'qualified' and who I would not hesitate reffering clients too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
guide me.

man you could not be more right on about there being too many guys out there pretending . i went to high school in sultan wa. right down the street from the hookey hole on the skykomish,this was cica 1985-6 , and we skipped school to go fishing ,got to the water and there were two guys standing in it so we watched for a while,then the upper guy went down to the lower guy pulled out a box and worked on the other guys setup for a minute then there were some thoughtfu hand gestures and some extended arm pointing the guy threw a cast and a few second later the rod was bent and the fish was landed right in front of us ,chrome hen. i,ll never forget what happened next . the guy who caught the fish took out his wallet and tried giving him money right in the water .thats when we put it together that he was a guide,and from then on thats what i wanted . now that i have the experience its the last thing i want . theres a difference between being happy fishing and not being happy while fishing with some 350#er that murders your supplies and is grumpy because its raining then he falls in the water .........
its hard work period. theres guides and then theres guys who take people fishing for money and dont forget the politics .
 

·
That Guy in PEI.....
Joined
·
1,945 Posts
Hard work for sure!!

Some real good points raised here. First, you cant pick a place to be a guide,,just doesn't work like that. You should grow up on the waters you intend to guide, literally, or at least, fishing experience wise. Anybody can figure out how to get to the finest pools,,, but what good is that if they dont fish it, study it(in all water levels---year after year) and love it? Guiding for money sucks,,, I know,, I have friends who do it. They hate it, and so do most of the poor clients who get stuck with them, they don't enjoy their days either. I've guided for 5 years now but have fished those rivers for close to 25! I know them about as well as i possibly could and am damned sure i can get a sport close to a fish in any condition.
As for what it takes?? It's @#*%! frustrating to watch a klutz make poor cast after poor cast, wont listen to constuctive criticism, knows everything!!!!, is better than you!!! and blames you that the salmon wont take his poor casts!!! It's 32deg
and the water is low,,, mosquitos, black flies and a stiff upstream wind. Those days are poison, and will test you mentally and physically. But the good days are great! Interesting, intelligent sports who know whats up and are eager to learn the idiosyncracies of a new water system. They are attentive, great casters, stream savvy, and are appreciative when the subtle things you show them work, and they are into a fish.(Scotch and tip to follow)!!!
My advise would be to guide a handful of sports and see how you like it. Its not for everyone. I wish you the best and hope you excel at it. Most who really love it do.
Good luck
Salmon Chaser
aka Dwayne Miller
><)))*>
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top