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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Great flies posted here recently guys...
Very inspiring...

These two are the result of an early early morning decision that it would be MUCH warmer in the house than sitting in a tree with a bow and arrow.....

I got some Blue Heron's recently, so I thought I'd try a purple spey on one and work on setting wings with BM.

I couldn't resist tying another Dee... they just seem to fish really well for me...

For some reason the heads ended up a bit wonky.....but they will swim OK.

I don't regret sleeping in. I will set the alarm for tomorrow though...

 

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The Dude abides
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nice!!! great bit of tying there! love em both, very sexy tinsel work on the spey, and proportions just right on the dee
 

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FISHIN' FREELANCER
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Very nicely done. Both. Hackling and proportions are quite pleasing to my eye. Love the BM wing :smokin:
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thanks for your comments on the ribbing on the spey guys.... but I do have a few questions about that...

Normally (on most flies), I tuck the hackle up behind a rib of oval tinsel. That seems to protect the hackle pretty well, even after it takes a stint in a fish's yap.

The questions I have pertain to the best method of "counter wrapping" a piece of oval tinsel, which I understand is standard technique on many spey flies.

*Is the counter wrap done LAST, with fine oval tinsel, over (and through) the hackle and other ribs as a reinforcement?... If so, does it "bump up" a bit as it goes over a heavier oval?

*Is it done with medium tinsel over the flat and fine tinsels, and then followed by the hackle tucked in behind it?... I thought about doing this but I wasn't sure about the idea of wrapping a hackle OVER two other ribs.

Perhaps someone with experience could shed some light on this. I took a shot in the dark on this tinsel work on this spey, and went with what has worked before for me. I am curious to learn a bit more about the tinsel work and ribbing on this type of fly though.

Thanks again guys.
 

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Thanks for your comments on the ribbing on the spey guys.... but I do have a few questions about that...

Normally (on most flies), I tuck the hackle up behind a rib of oval tinsel. That seems to protect the hackle pretty well, even after it takes a stint in a fish's yap.

The questions I have pertains to the best method of "counter wrapping"a piece of oval tinsel, which I understand is standard technique on many spey flies.

*Is the counter wrap done LAST, with fine oval tinsel, over (and through) the hackle and other ribs as a reinforcement?... If so, does it "bump up" a bit as it goes over a heavier oval?

*Is it done with medium tinsel over the flat and fine tinsels, and then followed by the hackle tucked in behind it?... I thought about doing this but I wasn't sure about the idea of wrapping a hackle OVER two other ribs.

Perhaps someone with experience could shed some light on this. I took a shot in the dark on this tinsel work on this spey, and went with what has worked before for me. I am curious to learn a bit more about the tinsel work and ribbing on this type of fly though.

Thanks again guys.

Real nice flies. I really like your tinsel work on both: It is especially well done in the spey.

Yes the rib is done last and it will create a slight bump depending on the size of tinsel used. Fine, small and even medium oval tinsel are not too thick that it becomes an issue though. Normally I prefer fine or small as a counter-rib. The slight bump is the reason that I prefer a ribbing arrangement where only the hackle is wrapped in the opposite direction to each of the tinsels for spey and dee flies when I tie them. This way only the hackle stem is crossed and about the only thing I do different than what you have done here.

As to the order of precedence - I wrap the flat first, then hackle. And on a fly with two oval tinsels - you certainly can counter-rib with both to further secure the hackle to the body.

Many old spey and dee patterns call for 3-5 bands of large or medium tinsels and ribs set well apart. They are fairly large if and when done strictly by the pattern. For small flies - the tinsels must be downsized accordingly in order to maintain the typical clean look of speys and dees.

Anyhow - hope that I hit upon what you are asking and again - lovely wraps.
Cheers.
 

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Beautiful tying. Good luck in the tree ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks FishOn...

So I guess it's just a matter of moving the hackles aside as you counter wrap the tinsel... I will play around with that in future.

Much appreciated.....


Real nice flies. I really like your tinsel work on both: It is especially well done in the spey.

Yes the rib is done last and it will create a slight bump depending on the size of tinsel used. Fine, small and even medium oval tinsel are not too thick that it becomes an issue though. Normally I prefer fine or small as a counter-rib. The slight bump is the reason that I prefer a ribbing arrangement where only the hackle is wrapped in the opposite direction to each of the tinsels for spey and dee flies when I tie them. This way only the hackle stem is crossed and about the only thing I do different than what you have done here.

As to the order of precedence - I wrap the flat first, then hackle. And on a fly with two oval tinsels - you certainly can counter-rib with both to further secure the hackle to the body.

Many old spey and dee patterns call for 3-5 bands of large or medium tinsels and ribs set well apart. They are fairly large if and when done strictly by the pattern. For small flies - the tinsels must be downsized accordingly in order to maintain the typical clean look of speys and dees.

Anyhow - hope that I hit upon what you are asking and again - lovely wraps.
Cheers.
 

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I use fine wire instead of tinsel for counter wrap fishing flies

Thanks FishOn...

So I guess it's just a matter of moving the hackles aside as you counter wrap the tinsel... I will play around with that in future.

Much appreciated.....
I use fine wire in a bobbin for a counter wrap for flies that I am going to fish, instead of presentation flies. I find that the wire doesn't trap as many hackle fibers, and is easier to apply to the fly with some tension to secure the hackle.


Mark
 
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