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Brockton
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Discussion Starter #1
Follow up to my previous thread, continuing the "research project"...

Can any offer commentary on the following entry level switch rods? Specifically how they might compare to each other? They've either been highly recommended on this forum or are from the very reputable companies, and are around $250:

Echo Classic 11ft 8 wt
Redington Dually 11'9" 8wt
Cabelas LSi 11'6" 8wt

Also - what do I get at the next price point up (Redington Prospector, Echo SR, TFO Deer Creek) that I don't get at this price point?

Still considering the used option, just one question at a time...
thanks
 

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Well, this all depends on what type of fishing your gonna be doing. Skagit, skandi, overhead, size of bird you intend to chuck. Id personally start at the buisness end and work back to figure out what grainage you need for the job.

Sent from my SGH-I547C using Tapatalk
 

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Scandit sublima virtus
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What you can get out of a given rod depends entirely on skill level and experience plays a big part too, diversity in experience particularly.

An entry level stick should give you the feedback required to learn to shape a loop consistently, be forgiving enough to recover from mistakes, and be cheap enough that you can leave it behind with no regrets if you decide to go on, looking to expand the performance envelope. Many casters don't, btw, because a fishable cast at a moderate distance gets them fish.

You have to find what works for you, but first you need to find your cast. Zis making sense?
 

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I think you've listed three rods relatively close to each other. The final decision is going to come down to your personal preferences. I have limited knowledge of two of the three rods but here's my take based on my experience:

The Echo is going to be the best built with the best components. It will have a more traditional action flexing deeper into the rod so you can feel the load. If it matters to you, (and it does to some) the Echo name might have slightly more/better prestige/reputation than the other two.

The Cabela's, especially if you wait for it in the bargain cave will be the least expensive. I wish Cabela's would upgrade the guides and the reel seat because the rod blank deserves better. The Cabela's casting action is probably the fastest of the three you mentioned. Again, here's where personal preference comes into play. I'm an impatient caster so a faster action works out better for me but I find some rods too fast. Lot's of folks prefer the more relaxed cast of a deeper bending rod.

I know the least about the Redington rod. I've cast it on only one occasion when I was shopping for a two handed trout rod. I ended up buying an Echo SR rod instead. IMHO, it falls in between the two above in every respect. Better components than the Cabela's but I like the Echo best. The Redington has a cork reel seat. I like the looks of the cork but worry about the durability of a cork reel seat. I need to cast this rod more to be sure but to me the action falls in between the Cabela's and the Echo. Again, personal preference, but my casting stroke didn't feel comfortable with this rod. However, I've had other rods that didn't feel comfortable at first but with more work became personal favorites.

My approach is to learn/try on less expensive rods to learn what you like and then get the top of the line rod in that category. Years ago I thought the Sage Z-axis 13.5' was the perfect rod for me. Then one day a buddy let me try his Winston switch rod and all of a sudden that Sage was no longer my favorite rod. Then after that I bought an Echo and latter a Cabela's. I'm not saying that Sage isn't a great rod, it maybe the best rod I've ever purchased, but I've got a $900 rod sitting in my trunk while I'm casting rods 4 times cheaper because I like the feel better. (Not because they cast better but I like the "feel" better.) OTH, if I can ever figure out what I like best I'll buy another Sage, Meiser, Anderson, Winston, etc. In fact, I can't wait to do exactly that. All my fishing buddies look down their noses at me every time I pull out one of my Cabela's rods.
 

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I was sold on the dually until i looked at a few. The cork on all was pretty poor. Have been told they cast wonderfully. Mileage may vary
 

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David,

I don't know the Echo, so recommend you give it a close look based on Gus's post. Redington Duallys are way too "tippy" for my taste, altho one acquaintance is very satisfied with his. Another friend had a Dually Spey, and the cork grip disintegrated to the point he replaced it twice, selling the last one and switching to another brand.

I really like the feel of the Cabela's LSi, but I like the 7 wt over the 8 wt in both Switch and Spey. Maybe that's because I'm generally partial to 7 wt rods. When the LSi goes on sale, it may be the best Spey/Switch value around anywhere.

Sg
 

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I have to agree with salmo_g. I have both the 12'6" 7 wt and the 11' 8 wt. I can make the 7 wt sing like an opera star but have yet to really achieve harmony with the eight wt.
 

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Echo and Redington

I've used the Redington Dually 11'9" 8 wt a lot. In my opinion it is a heck of a lot of two hander for the money. I Skagit cast it and it works well for me with an Airflo 510 grain Skagit switch line. I find myself grabbing this rod more often than 13' rods for much of the winter steel water I fish. I can throw very heavy fly/tip combos with this rod if necessary. I too was concerned about the cork reel seat, but found I almost never touch the reel seat so it really isn't subjected to much wear. After a fall, winter and spring of much use, the real seat looks basically new.

I've used the Echo 11' but in a 6 wt. I thought this was a great rod too, but haven't used it as much as the Redington rod. I used a 390 grain Airflo Skagit switch on it with mostly T-8 and T-10 tips to 10 feet long. This rod was easier casting then some more expensive 11' 6 wt rods I've tried. I seemed to handle a little more payload and cast slightly longer distances for me than my TFO 11' 6 wt Deer Creek.

If I had to choose between the Echo 11' 8 wt and the Redington 11'9" 8 wt, I'd pick the Redington for the fishing I do most. The main reason is length. It's short enough to get tight to brush, but the extra 9" makes it easier to cast and fish than the 11 footers, for me anyway.
 

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as one poster asks, I am curious what you plan to target with an 8? Can't think of many instances where I would reach for an 8 rather than a 7 at least for steelhead
 

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Brockton
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Discussion Starter #10
as one poster asks, I am curious what you plan to target with an 8? Can't think of many instances where I would reach for an 8 rather than a 7 at least for steelhead
Fair question. Mostly it's because the rod that I'm replacing is an 8wt and I've got full sets of basically brand new skagit and scandi systems already in the 8wt range. Can't afford to get all that stuff again at a lower grain weight, so I'm reverse engineering the rod choice for my through the manufacturer's line recs and the advice I'm getting here. If I were starting from total scratch I'd probably get a 7.

Is ok though - the Lake Ontario rivers I fish most are loaded with Kings for the first half of the run anyway and I don't mind the 8wt if I end up tangling with one of them. Also it's windy as hell here 90% of the time...
 

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Who says you even have to spend $250?? You can go even cheaper with the Cabela's TLRs. I own both of the 7wts and the 6wt. Don't see why either of the 8wt TLR switches wouldn't be great rods as well. At $149.99 you can't go wrong. I really love my 3 TLR switches.

Todd
 
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