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Discussion Starter #1
I have been flyfishing for a while now and have been happy with the single handed rods but last month while in Alaska I watched a fella downstream fishing a spey rod and seemed to make sense. I had busting my butt to get my fly where I wanted across the river and he was just laying it out there, over and over again. (King fishing on the Kasilof)

So it placed a seed in my head and not I want one. I am going back to Alaska for most of August and am looking for advise on a good spey rod to use mostly for silvers in streams (8-12lbs w/ hopefully a chance at one closer to 20lbs) but will also use it in the bays for silvers and to play around on pinks over in Kodiak a couple days.

So, what weight/action rod and set up would work best for the silvers in medium to large rivers (Kasilof/Kenai) and in the bays/river mouths? Most my single handed rods are sage and have been quite pleased with their products and service so was looking at the Euro action 7141-4 or 9141-4. Will the 7wt work fine? Not going to be using sinking line or heavy tube flys, most the fish are close in on the saltwater and will be using mostly floating line.

Would the 9141-4 be overkill on the silvers? I keep eyeing it for Kings next year but don't mind having to get a 7wt this year and then the 9wt next if both would be needed.

Whichever I get will also be played with behind the Texas dams here which have nice stripers and down on the Texas coastal flats.

Any other options/input will be greatly appreciated.

Tightlines,

Bill
 

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Pullin' Thread
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I would go with the Sage 9141 rather than the 7141. he 7141 is really made for summer run steelhead up to about 10 pounds and flies not bigger than #6. The 9141 is a better choice for fish that are going to be between 8 and 12 pounds and it can cast a larger/heavier fly much easier than the 7141.

Yes, the 9141 will be overkill for pinks; but you said that most of your fishing will be for silvers. The 9 weight will let you land the fish in a reasonably quick time instead of having to play it to near exhaustion with the 7 weight.

You should also look into the Loop Blue series 9 weight, the CND Custom 14 foot 9 weight, the Burkheimer 9 weights, the Redington 14 foot 9 weight, the new Hardy's in 9 wieght, or the Loomis 14 foot 9 weight Trilogy Series. These all have a moderate action, which seems to be what you are looking for as opposed to the fast action of the T&T, Loop Green Series, or Loomis GLX.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What about the 9150-4

I will have a few other rods with me to use on rainbows from the drift boats and on the pinks.

What is the Sage 9150-4 (green blank) like action wise? I found one new in the tube on closeout (leftover stock from 2001-2002).

Thanks for the help.

Bill
 

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The 9150 is a decent rod. I tend to not notice action so much as how the rod casts and it's been a couple years but the 9150 I cast was a nice rod.

I have never cast the 7141 but the 9141 is an excellent spey rod with a moderate action would be good for silvers and would very likely handle kings.


As far as Burkheimers go 7133-3 would be great for floating line and very light rips and would be fun for pinks and silvers. The 8139 would be a good all around rod and The 8133,9143 and 9149 would all be good choices for chinook.
 

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Bill,

The Sage 9150 (green) is a decent moderate action 9 weight rod that would probably serve your needs well. I think it would best serve you with a RIO MidSpey 8/9 or Long Delta 8/9 line. And if you can get it at a closeout price, go for it.
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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Bill -

Question for ya... was the other angler spey casting or overhead casting?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What about for stripers/redfish/etc.

So, I am still on the fence between the 7141 and 9141. I think I have ruled out the 9150, several folks here locally have steered me towards the 14' rod as an intial endeavor. (I have the info on the closeout $565 Sage 9150-4 new in the tube with warranty from a sage dealer if anyone interested--just e-mail me) Plus one of the dealers I use often is taking in another rod from me on trade--offered me more than I think it would bring on e-bay so likely going with a current new rod. He will have to order it so no difference to them which I choose, except the owner says he personally prefers and usually recommends the T&T's.

So, setting kings off to the side for the moment, which of the two would best serve me for silvers in Alaska, fresh water stripers in big rivers, and redfish/sea trout on the coast--7141 or 9141. (Sage or T&T)

Thanks again for all the helpful input.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Juro-casting

He was spey casting mostly. The portion of the river he was working had spruce up close to the river bank, about 300 yds down from crooked creek, so there wasn't much room. He looked to me making a few different style casts though. Just from my completely unexperianced observation.

Bill
 

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Bill,

In my opinion both rods will fit the bill admirably. I think your decision should consider your future speyfishing plans. If it is most likely that you will only get one rod, then I suggest the 9 weight, it will do much more in the the way of multiple duty. If on the other hand you can see yourself with a second rod, then I suggest the 7 weight right now. Then later, you can get a rod that is a little better suited to heavy work. By the way, I would suggest you consider a 15' 10 weight for the heavier work - especially for chinook - the 9 weight will be undergunned in many situations.

With a 7 and 10 weight you will be pretty much set for any fishing situation you will run across. If it's going to be a one rod show however, then the 9 weight will handle most light work and be enough rod for most heavy work.

A word of warning though :tsk_tsk: once you start down the road of multiple doublehanders - it becomes a slippery slope very quickly!
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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Since you are just getting started the highest criteria besides getting a good tool for fighting the fish you are targeting is how well you can operate that tool, in other words how you'll get to the hook up. The easier the rod is to cast, also the better the line matches up with the rod, the faster the learning curve will be. Faster yet if you knew that other gentleman down river!

IMHO you should be thinking equally in terms of castability of the rod, and learning how to spey cast. It's not something you're going to get in one day. Also how does the total outfit accomodate what you want to do - rod/reel/line/etc. Some rods just love some lines, they just fit together like a hand in glove.

Sage makes fine rods, as do CND Spey rods, Burkheimer, and any others that have or have not been mentioned here. But the selection of the rod for you is probably best answered as "the rod you operate best for what you wish to do".

Nothing is more frustrating than spending big bucks on a spey rod and not being able to decipher spey casting on your own. I can only guess how many people have done this. Likewise there are few things in all of flyfishing as blissful or fulfilling than being able to spey cast effortlessly along a river's bank. Worth every bit of work in the pursuit and more. Cast, learn, feel, experience a little - then buy.

.02
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Too-Late

I have been trying to find a spey rod to try out here locally to no avail. I finally was able to locate a number to a fella a couple hours away that is said to give spey lessons and I will be giving him a call this weekend to set up a couple lessons well in advance of my trip. Fortunately I have a great place to use the rod on big river stripers about 30miles north of me behind the dam at Lake Texoma.

I would love some further input on lines, etc. too if available. (Not sure if I should move the topic over to tackle though)

To late to try out the abundance of choices out there--I just ordered a rod seconds ago. I went with the T&T 1409-5. Spoke to several other folks who recommended and it breaks down to the same size as my saltwater single handers for travel convience. (So, please feel free to lie to me from this point on if ya'll think it was the wrong choice--just kiddin)

I still need reel and line info. I am leaning towards getting another Able Big Game #3 spool which I think should hold the right amount of line. It is rated to hold 12wt + 200yds of 30lb backing. Does this sound about right?

What line do ya'll recommend trying out first? On the single handers last trip, we did all fishing with floating line and longer leaders and lead eye'd flies--but some rivers like the russian have weight restrictions on flies and require all lead over a certain weight to be 18" back of the fly. (Alaska--gotta luv it)

Also, please shout out any known spey fanatics in the Dallas area--I will be looking for instruction.

Thank ya'll all again so much for the info--this really is a super cool board (went back to the beginning in the rod section, lots of great info)

Bill
 

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getting into spey fishing

WildBill,

I also started getting more and more into spey casting, and know exactly what you're going through as far as that initial and then peaking of interest. With any sport in general, I just wanted to add to Juro's comment about having the best gear yet not putting in the many days and tiring hours it takes to properly use it. Fortunately, I live very close to the casting pond facility here in San Francisco, where in July the Angler's Lodge will hold a nationwide flycasting tournament (actually, this weekend Tim and Steve are showing up for a small team tournament and filming event). So far everyone at the lodge has been really supportive of my spey casting, constantly critiquing it, etc., which has helped tons. Also as a beginner for me it really has helped to watch guys and gals that can cast well and afar. Spey casting videos have been great a subsitute in this area, so if you don't have a casting facility and the commradery of avid spey casters, I'd say get an instructional video. I have the Derek Brown Spey Maste-rrrrr-Class. It's kind of grainy and his accent is thick as his moustache, so if you don't mind the distractions it seems a good deal.

So far I've come along way since my first spey cast with a two hander, putting in practice every other day at the casting pools, and hope that you have as many opportunities to practice casting often. As for me, my first true spey fishing trip looks like it will be on one of the tributaries of the Fraser River this August. They say this fall run will be the strongest that that system has seen in years.


Tight Lines.
 

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WB-
If you're looking for line recommendations, look to the column to the left, scroll down and find the 2003 Rio Spey line recommendations as per Simon Gawesworth. There you will find your new toy and info that will suggest what line will suit your needs. Something in a MidSpey would be best to learn on. Before you take the long walk on the Spey side, check the condition of your carbide spikes on your boots and heed Kush's advise. Once the itch and twitch start, it's a slippery slope. Been there-done that. Fall down-Get up- keep on truckin'. Won't admit to my ex how many spey rods I have. Nobody saw me do it- can't prove anything.:p

C. <')))><
 

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The RIO MidSpey 8/9 with tips would be my choice for the T&T 1409-5 because there are 3 sinking tips, and intermediate, and a floater included with the line making it a very versitile system, which you said you are looking for.

Also, I'm rather biased toward T&T 2-handers because they are my favorite 2-handed rods, so I'll simply say you will not be unhappy with your rod choice.

As far as reels go, any reel that will hold a 12 weight line and 300 yards of backing will be more than adequate for an 8/9 or 9/10 spey line.
 
J

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Two points on Flytyer's post. First of all, notice he said 12wt and 300yds of 30#. Since the Abel is only rated for 200yds of 30# it might be pretty close. Secondly, I think an experienced speyfisher will prefer the 8/9 Mid-Spey, but I'm also quite certain that a new caster will do better with that rod with an 9/10 Mid-Spey. By the way, you got a terrific rod. I actually like the five piece version better than the same rod in a three piece.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thank you all.

Thank you all for the recommendations, information, and pointers. I am still trying to locate some intruction here locally to no avail but aint given up just yet.

Found the line recommendations page. Think the mid-spey will be my first outing, on the fence bewteen the 8/9 or 9/10, leaning towards the 9/10 I guess becuase they suggestion on the page that it may be better suited for newbies like myself.

Wish I would have had the rod already today just to cast and play with. I usually head over to a local park or pond and cast a few times a week--but today was out on one of our beautiful lakes out east of Dallas. We were out in a boat chasing stripers, my buddy was using conventional tackle and I fished with him a bit too, but hooked into two stripers, around 5 and 8lbs, and a few sand bass on my RPLXi. Good fun.

Thanks again all.
 

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Reel

For your setup a reel with capacity of WF12Float + 300 yards of 30# Micron [standard diameter dacron backing] is a minimum. This rated capacity for standard single handed lines will allow you to spool on a WindCutter 9.10.11, or a MidSpey 8/9 with 200 yards of 30# Micron.

Getting a reel of lesser capacity and you will have to deal with GSP backing to get 200 yards on behind the bulky spey lines. Also the right size reel [read large] will be heavy enough to balance your outfit. IMHO a common mistake is to get a reel that is too light for proper balance. The rod should balance at the hold point on the upper portion of the upper grip when the fly line head is hanging out of the tip top guide.

My T&T 1409 balances with an 11 ounce reel.
 

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WildBill
Congratulations on your choice - a 14' #9 is a good start, I agree with J R SPEY the midspey is the line to get - I would probibaly get a 9/10, it will load the rod more easily - the 8/9 would be the choice for the more advanced caster, who would probibaly have a crisper stroke and be shooting more line on the delivery.
Kush is right about the slippery slope of multiple speyrods(my count is 7 & set to climb) - with this in mind I have a few comments on a rod for kings/springs. I have just returned from a week of chasing them - I started with a 10151(all my rods are Sage) last year but found it very unforgiving with the 15-24' LC-13 tips we use(10/11 midspey line) - so I returned with a 10150 and found it to be just the ticket on this years trip(while this is a discontinued rod there are still some to be found). I have also landed springs on the 9150 and a friend has taken fish up to 37lb on his 9140(his current 1st choice is the 10150) - while the latter 2 rods can handle springs they are seriously outgunned in heavy water, especialy with fish in the +30lb range. I have cast the 10161(but not fished it) and feel it should do well on springs - has anyone out there used this rod on springs?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Kings

I will likely use this rod next year for Kings and then adjust from there. I hauled out a few smaller kings to 28lbs this year on my 890-RPLXi but that was in the Kasilof which is a much smaller river and before the higher water and currents started (mid-May).

Thank yall for the word of warning too on multiple spey rods but fear it has fallen on deaf ears--I am a toy freak. As we speak I am trying to find a nice older bamboo rod to have restored--wife is doing it for my 30th b-day.

Thanks again,

Bill
 
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