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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys,

Nice to meet all of you, I'm a first time poster and am looking for some info (lots of info actually!).

I've never Spey fished before, but I have fly fished for steelhead with streamers and egg imitations with some success, I used to do a lot of centerpin fishing but that gets boring fast. I also observed lots of steelhead moving through runs and areas where there was current but it was not deep enough to fish a float effectively and the amount of false casting required on my single handed rod to get the fly where it needed to be was exhausting and not effective. So I decided to get myself a spey rod, but this leads me to some questions.

What rod do I need? I was thinking about either getting a 13ft Spey or a 11ft Switch rod. I figured the Switch rod would be better for me as I could switch it to a single handed rod. What do you guys think?

What weight of rod do I need? I have 8wt SA Steelheader line on my single handed rod which is supposed to be suitable for a switch rod if overlined two sizes. Will a 6wt switch rod be sufficient for steelhead? The steelhead out where I am don't really push 12lbs often. Average size is about 6lb. I also won't likely be fishing any really large flies.

What else do I need? I'll have a rod, a reel (hopefully I can make my current 8wt reel dual purpose) maybe reuse my 8wt steelhead line.... what else?

I went to my local fly shop for some assistance, unfortunatley I don't think many guys in that shop fish with switch rods or spey rods. They wern't very helpful.

Any help is appreciated, i'm a total noob so take it easy on me! Thanks in advance!

MarkyZ
 

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Got Steelhead?
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36 Posts
SAGE is the rod

The sage 7110 or 6110 TCX will blow you away and will be very easy to learn on because you will be used to snapping the rod being a pinner. The rods can be matched with so many lines but I like the skagit shorts for hucking big tips like 10-12' of T11, and a skagit flight or scandi for light or delicate work. The Rages are a great way for the scandi. Take the time to get on the water with an experienced caster, it will save you years. Believe me.
 

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Jack Cook
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Wecome

Take to Peter Charles

http://ww-.hooked4life.ca
replace the - with a w

He is in your neck of the woods, a great guy, good friend and knowlegable about your water and two handed gear
 

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For something the size of the credit you may be better off with a 7wt switch rod, I fish the credit with a 13'9 8wt and a 12'6 5wt and I find the 13'9 to be too big for those waters, but it can be done. Credit is a great fishery, lots of good runs for swinging flies. You will find me there through the cold winter months when a lot of the other Ontario tribs shut down. Welcome to the addiction.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Welcome! Are you in Toronto? I go to school here and would be willing to show you some stuff.
Hey TheWhiteman, I work downtown and live in Brampton, I usually fish the Credit around Erindale Park, I'll deffinately let you know when I have everything setup and ready to roll.

What do you guys think of the Angler's Roost 6/7 wt Switch Rods? I was thinking about starting out with one of those, they are 11' and appear to be very cost effective.
 

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Would recommend something like the Sage 7110. Heard good things about them and they're on discount these days/here in the classifieds. If you search the anglers roost rod here, you'll likely find many responses
 

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I don't know specifics about that blank but 11-12' on the credit will allow you to do everything. 6 or 7 weight is perfect, in my opinion.
I'd suggest getting a dedicated line for whatever rod you choose as you'll probably end up there anyway. Grindstone Angling in Waterdown has spey stuff and the sponsors here won't steer you the wrong way.

You'll probably save yourself some time by going out with someone. Either a guide or find someone on here. Learn how to cast, wear some sort of protective eyewear! :chuckle:

Peter Charles has some great casting videos and there are others (skagit master is pretty good if you want to go with skagit lines).

Feel free to PM me if you have any specific questions and I can give you my phone number. I am by no means an expert nor have I caught a ton of fish but I might help you avoid some mistakes that I made!!

Best

Brent
 

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Hooked4life
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Hi Mark

I fish the Credit as do a lot of other guys here. An 11' to 12' rod is enough for swinging a fly on that river. Given some of the deep holes, I use a range of shooting heads/Skagit lines from floating to full sinking, depending on flow rates. I prefer the 12' rod for the extra reach and ease of covering the water, especially when using full sinkers. I do use an intermediate Skagit setup for the 11 footer and that works, but it requires a soft touch to lift well. The 12' just makes things that much easier.

As a general rule, I fish the 11' rod with a Skagit setup when the flow rates are low, switching over to the 12' rod and sinking Scandi setups when flow rates climb.

I've fished it with rods as long as 13' 6" but that ended up as overkill. No need for anything more than a Scandi or Skagit setup, except for winter days when guide icing is an issue. On those days a 55' line will do the job.

If you want to also fish for chinook with the swung fly, consider a short 9/10 rod. A good sized steelhead will still put a decent bend in it, but a chinook won't break it.

I strongly suggest some casting lessons before investing too heavily in tackle. It'll save you money in the long run.

Email pr PM me if you'd like some more info or clarification on some of the terms I've used in this post.
 

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Drags are for Sissys
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308 Posts
... 1 agree with Peter

I swing the Credit alot - here is my opinion

If you are looking for one rod to do it all on the Credit, its a 12 or 12.5 foot, 7 or 8 weight. Anything lighter in line weight won't let you throw heavier tips and bigger flies needed when the water is high and clearing. Anything longer is over kill. Anything shorter makes it difficult to mend properly to keep the fly going slowly enough across complex currents when the water is high and clearing (the river can be much wider then) - some of the best fishing.

And I'd agree with Peter; spey lessons when you are new to spey will save you countless hours of frustration and save you mucho $ buying gear you don't really need.
 

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I fish the credit mostly with an 11' 7wt lined with a beulah elixir switch scandi +tips sometimes with a 13' 9wt lined with a 55' carron dry line. Both aren't ideal but i dont want to buy a 12' rod. Most double handers on the river are pretty friendly (my experiance) and are more than willing to answer your questions, just dont "low hole" and you'll be fine.

oh and welcome to Speypages!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the advice guys, I've gone ahead and booked a lesson with Peter Charles. I'm self taught when it comes to single handed fly casting and I developed a bunch of bad habits, I'd prefer not to repeat that!

I can't seem to find the Sage 7110 anywhere. Looks like it's discontinued, it was a decent price point too. I'm back to thinking about the Angler's Roost 6/7 11' switch, only $130... What do you guys think?
 

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Smart decision. I'm not familiar with the angler roost rod. I'm sure if you posted a Sage 7110 want to buy ad on the classifieds here, you would likely find many willing sellers.
 
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