Double Hooks - Spey Pages
 9Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 08:29 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Don Walker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: New England - Mass
Posts: 74
Double Hooks

I have fished for Atlantic Salmon and trout but have never fished for Pacific Salmon or Steelhead. Do you ever use double hooks? Is it legal? We used doubles almost exclusively for Atlantics not for the hooking ability of a double (I don't think it was better) but because of the way a double hook tracked on the swing.
Don Walker is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 18 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 09:04 AM
Registered User
 
Nickels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 456
Can’t use them in a river here in B.C. it’s all single barbless sir. Maybe in the U.S. I’m not sure.
Nickels is online now  
post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 01:49 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Don Walker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: New England - Mass
Posts: 74
Thanks for the info...I hear from friends that its single hook only now on the Miramichi in N.B.
Don Walker is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old 07-30-2019, 02:05 PM
Registered User
 
CSFT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 1,209
To the best of my knowledge only Quebec allows doubles for Atlantic Salmon in Canada...with certain size restrictions.

Since I've never been west for Steelhead I have no knowledge on the subject for those rivers.

Petri Heil,
George
The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits - Albert Einstein
CSFT is online now  
post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-10-2019, 04:07 PM
T17
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Rogue Valley
Posts: 79
Small sizes are still in use on the Rogue... Mainly in the mid to lower river.
T17 is offline  
post #6 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-10-2019, 08:36 PM
Registered User
 
steelguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Wrangell, Southeast Alaska
Posts: 112
singles in Alaska

I fish Alaska for salmon and steelhead and I believe only single hooks are allowed.
steelguy is offline  
post #7 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-11-2019, 12:42 AM
Registered User
 
Humpty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Northern California (emphasis northern)
Posts: 139
Not positive but I believe California allows multiple hooks. Most regs call for barbless only.
I only fish single barbless so have never really looked into it. Something about a fish being landed with its jaw pinned shut top and bottom by a double or treble hook is unappealing.
borano20 and steelguy like this.

Humpty
Humpty is offline  
post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-11-2019, 10:23 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Ontario-Québec
Posts: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Humpty View Post
Not positive but I believe California allows multiple hooks. Most regs call for barbless only.
I only fish single barbless so have never really looked into it. Something about a fish being landed with its jaw pinned shut top and bottom by a double or treble hook is unappealing.
I mostly fish doubles for Atlantic salmon in QC when hook size is less than #4. I have never seen a fish hooked in both jaws with a double, though I suspect trebles would. I think doubles do less damage to a fish than a single, as when the pull is in different directions, one point or the other receives the pressure instead of a single hook swivelling all over the place and cutting up the fish. Big long-shank singles are the worst.
hitcher and Wetwader like this.
The Thrasher is offline  
post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-11-2019, 11:55 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Tay,Tweed,Ribble.
Posts: 353
Humpty, sorry old boy but you have never been further from the truth.Doubles or Trebles will very very rarely if ever pin a fish's mouth shut.
I personally fish almost exclusively Trebles here in the UK and I've never seen nor experienced a fish with its mouth pinned shut by hooks!,EVER!
Yorkie.
YORKIE is offline  
post #10 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-13-2019, 11:33 PM
Registered User
 
Humpty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Northern California (emphasis northern)
Posts: 139
Rarely pinned top and bottom perhaps, but occasionaly non the less. I have personally experienced it on more than one occasion. As a matter of fact, as a lad i fished many times with blue foxes, mepps, and spoons and multiple times landed fish hooked top and bottom. I just stated the point was i prefer to fish with one, unbarbed point, instead of two or three. You can fish with whatever you like, and i hope you tangle with some beauties!

Humpty
Humpty is offline  
post #11 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-14-2019, 04:12 AM
''Speydo-masochist''
 
Tyke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: UK, Towy, Tweed, Dee, Deveron
Posts: 1,253
Most double or treble hooks are fished in much smaller sizes than single hooks tend to be.

Singles are often fished in 1/0 size whereas a double hook is not normally used above a size 4 & trebles usually not bigger than a 6. They are heavier in equivalent sizes because of the additional points/ metal & the additional holding power allows a reduced gape to be used successfully.

Certainly when used in conjunction with tube flies then a 3/4 inch tube with a size 14 treble or a size 12 tube double will do minimal damage and is highly unlikely to secure both jaws together, it will penetrate a lot less deeply than the equivalently sized 8 single hook would.

This has to be considered as it isn't simply a case of multiple large hooks such as the grappling irons fitted to most spinners and the results of the hook placement & damage caused are far different.

Regards, Tyke.
hitcher and Wetwader like this.
Tyke is offline  
post #12 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-14-2019, 06:52 AM
MHC
Registered User
 
MHC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: S Ontario rivers plus various lakes for warm water species.
Posts: 555
What tends to happen with multiple point hooks, large or small, is the possible catching and ripping of tissue near those points not embedded during the fight. I am not sure that both points of a double hook could be relied to 'go in' evenly every time, although if smaller they would go in less deeply.

There are differences in the traditions between European salmon fly fishing and in N. America, where single hooks used tend to be smaller.

I subscribed to Trout & Salmon magazine (UK) for many years and saw those small doubles and treble flies featured, sometimes with just a few hairs dressed on them. The magazine also had articles on spinning for salmon, describing techniques for using spoons, spinners, Devon Minnows and Flying 'C's' all sporting treble hooks. Certainly it was understood that as not all water suites the fly, using artificials has it's place and sporting appeal, unlike the derogatory references to 'gear' angling over here.

To my mind, fishing double or even treble point flies (of any size) increases snagging on weeds, rocks, stones etc. They may add extra weight and help the fly 'track' more steadily, however that could equally done with a little weight added and/ or carefully considering application of tying materials.

Removing one of those sticky little flies (unless they are barbless) will be more of a challenge, certainly.

I fish for many species with both fly and spinner (using bamboo of course..) and have replaced the treble hooks from spoons and spinners with smaller, often barbless, Siwash single hooks for the reasons mentioned, to great advantage.

Malcolm

Last edited by MHC; 08-14-2019 at 08:08 AM.
MHC is offline  
post #13 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-14-2019, 03:36 PM
Registered User
 
ENSO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 331
If there is one broad conclusion from the catch and release literature, it is that long-shank single hooks are often lethal due to spearing and bleeding caused by cutting of the gills.

I do not recall small double and treble hooks increasing mortality.

The literature on sub-lethal scarring is much more limited. Once again, I do not recall small doubles or trebles causing more sub-lethal damage than similar single hooks. Single hooks by themselves are more than capable of turning salmonids into ugly-looking pin cushions.

°

Science is not common sense. Much of it is devoted to a systematic documentation of what we do not know and understand.
ENSO is offline  
post #14 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-14-2019, 06:55 PM
MHC
Registered User
 
MHC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: S Ontario rivers plus various lakes for warm water species.
Posts: 555
Which begs the question I suppose, why would double and treble (fly) hooks then be illegal on many rivers and streams. One local trout stretch of the Grand River, Ontario, where I fish is posted 'Catch & Release Only - artificial lures, single barbless hooks '. One presumes these hooks do the least damage.

Having fly fished since the mid 1970's I have (luckily) yet to experience a fly caught back in the gills causing the damage described, for either trout or salmon, nymphs or streamers, wet or dry; using both single and double handed techniques both in the UK and N. America.

Trying to extricate more than one buried point of a barbed double or treble hook( of any size) from a fish one intends to release, can be problematic. How many bass have I caught with torn/ damaged mouths due to anglers trying to remove the treble hooks of lures by twisting and pulling. Then there is the damage as the fish, of any species, twists and cavorts at the end of the line, of course barbless hooks alleviate the impact to some extent, being easier to remove.

Single hooks for me all the way, of an appropriate and modest size; more sporting by all accounts and kinder to the fish.

Malcolm

Last edited by MHC; 08-14-2019 at 07:59 PM.
MHC is offline  
post #15 of 18 (permalink) Old 08-14-2019, 09:50 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Ontario-Québec
Posts: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by MHC View Post
Which begs the question I suppose, why would double and treble (fly) hooks then be illegal on many rivers and streams. One local trout stretch of the Grand River, Ontario, where I fish is posted 'Catch & Release Only - artificial lures, single barbless hooks '. One presumes these hooks do the least damage.

Having fly fished since the mid 1970's I have (luckily) yet to experience a fly caught back in the gills causing the damage described, for either trout or salmon, nymphs or streamers, wet or dry; using both single and double handed techniques both in the UK and N. America.

Trying to extricate more than one buried point of a barbed double or treble hook( of any size) from a fish one intends to release, can be problematic. How many bass have I caught with torn/ damaged mouths due to anglers trying to remove the treble hooks of lures by twisting and pulling. Then there is the damage as the fish, of any species, twists and cavorts at the end of the line, of course barbless hooks alleviate the impact to some extent, being easier to remove.

Single hooks for me all the way, of an appropriate and modest size; more sporting by all accounts and kinder to the fish.

Malcolm
Double hooks are legal on the Grand tailwater special regs areas.
The Thrasher is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Spey Pages forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Linear Mode Linear Mode
Rate This Thread:



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome