The Art of Spey Casting DVD - Spey Pages
 
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post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-10-2008, 09:28 AM Thread Starter
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The Art of Spey Casting DVD

I think this is a good basic DVD. It's strengh is that so many casters offer a slightly different perspectives and different techniques. What I found lacking in the video are answers to a few fundemental questions that a newbie like me thinks are essential, e.g.: Where should the anchor be? How much fly line, if any, should make up the anchor? What adjustments will a caster have to make casting different-head lines?

Also much of the info is repetitive. I would like to see more about the double spey and when to use it.

Randy
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post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-12-2008, 08:20 PM
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Randy,
I also own that DVD and like it. Although it is not explained explicitly in the DVD you will find that casters using shorter head lines use shorter casting strokes with arms close to the body. Casters using longer belly lines like Nobuo and Steve Choate use longer strokes with arms further away from the body and held higher-at least these are my obervations and experience with casting different lines. In general for touch and go casts you want your anchor to be just the first few feet of flyline set parallel to and out from your casting plane for the forward cast. This will allow relaxed and effortless casting since you will not be fighting line stick as much.

John/Amy Hazel and Andy Murray explain the double/reverse double spey and it's use very well in the DVD. Whenever you have a downstream wind, you will want to consider using the double spey/reverse double spey, depending on which side of the river you are on and whether you are right or left handed.

I am right handed and have recently learned to make reverse/off shoulder casts and they come in handy often! I find this ability opens up more water to me than before and reduces frustration and tree cutting.

God Bless, Todd
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post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-13-2008, 09:39 AM Thread Starter
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Downstream Wind?

Todd,

Thanks so much for the info. One thing I'm still not sure of. I always hear
when there's a strong downstream wind use a double spey. I'm not sure what downstream means. Does that mean wind from my rear that causes my D-loop to collapse, or from my right that will blow the line and fly into me. (I'm right handed.)

Randy
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post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-13-2008, 02:29 PM
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Randy:

I understand your confusion and this raises an important point. In reality wind does not always blow straight upstream or straight downstream - it often blows cross stream, diagonal up, diagonal down, straight toward you, etc, then changes direction! This is why learning as many different casts as you can over time is valuable.

As a beginner, be patient with yourself, get an instructor if you can. Since I live in Hawaii, I am totally self taught with the huge help of instructional dvds like the Art of Spey Casting and others. I have probably developed some bad habits, but at least I get my fly to the fish and just enjoy spey casting regardless, so I am happy!

Back to your question, a down stream wind is one that is blowing in the same general direction that the river is flowing. In general, you want to use a cast that places the d-loop on the downwind side of your body so the wind is not blowing your d-loop towards the body, but away from the body. Over time and with practice and experience, you will learn how to instictively choose the right cast for the wind direction and other conditions as well as being able to tweak your technique for those sometimes minute breezes that start blowing your casts.

As you become more profiecient with your casting, you will find situations where you start "bending the rules" and still getting the job done. A good example is what Derek Brown calls the square cut (also demonstrated on the Art of Spey Casting by one of the guys from Japan). This is essentially using a single spey in a downstream wind. You get away with this cast by placing the d-loop off to the side and away from the body. Another thing, I tend to tilt the rod off to the the side of my body most of the time during my forward casts - this helps ensure that those sharp hooks stay in the air/water and not my flesh.

Sorry to overload you!
Todd
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post #5 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-14-2008, 10:36 AM Thread Starter
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Todd,

Thanks so, so much. Your info is really helpful to me.

Randy
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