Right line for my rod - Spey Pages
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post #1 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-16-2020, 05:51 PM Thread Starter
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Hey guys, I'm a newbie here, decided to learn spey , I bought a Sage X switch rod 8114 because the river near me is not that big, I thought 11ft will do the job, and I paired it with intouch Switch chucker Spey #8 line with 25 ft head, 520gr. During my practice I found out that the line is too heavy with the sinking leader and streamer, and difficult to cast. Is my setup incorrect? Please give me your advice,any help is appreciated.

Last edited by DillonH; 04-17-2020 at 02:50 PM.
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post #2 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-16-2020, 06:38 PM
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According to Rio website InTouch Switch is roughly 55 feet.

If you are going to try learning on your own - it is perhaps the most difficult route to take. But it can be done.

Other than that: Try holding the line with a shorter length beyond the tiptop. Say 40 and with a tapered leader and fly for now.
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post #3 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-16-2020, 06:57 PM
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You don't say what kind of casting you are doing. If you are using the setup you describe and trying to do an overhead cast, you definitely have way too much weight. These lines and sink tips are designed to be used with sustained anchor casts which makes the sink tip not be as much of a factor. So...for now find a floating line, a used skagit line for your rod would be perfect. Learn your basic Double Spey and Snap T casts with the floater and then move into the InTouch setup. Getting some lessons is the best way to learn.
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post #4 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 10:31 AM
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I believe you would be much happier with a shorter Skagit, or perhaps a Rage Scandi type line. I would go with a short-head Skagit line around 550 grains if you want to toss tips and a slightly lighter Rage for dry line work. One can toss longer heads with shorter rods but it is much more difficult.
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post #5 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 10:49 AM
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Lots of unknowns here. I'm not familiar with this line. It was mentioned it's about 55', sounds midbelly'ish. Was it designed to carry tips or are you talking about a poly leader. Weighted fly like an intruder or something on the small side? What type of casting have you been attempting? Either way if you don't perform the lift correctly to get the line out of the water at the beginning of the cast the rest of it will never come together for you.

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post #6 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 02:34 PM Thread Starter
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Sorry,I didn't describe line correctly, that should be intouch switch chucker, that comes with short head 25 ft.
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According to Rio website InTouch Switch is roughly 55 feet.

If you are going to try learning on your own - it is perhaps the most difficult route to take. But it can be done.

Other than that: Try holding the line with a shorter length beyond the tiptop. Say 40 and with a tapered leader and fly for now.
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post #7 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 02:40 PM Thread Starter
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I was trying to learn a snap T and double spey , as you said ,I did try normal clear line(maybe float line) yesterday, it works, Maybe sinking leader is much difficult for beginner.
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You don't say what kind of casting you are doing. If you are using the setup you describe and trying to do an overhead cast, you definitely have way too much weight. These lines and sink tips are designed to be used with sustained anchor casts which makes the sink tip not be as much of a factor. So...for now find a floating line, a used skagit line for your rod would be perfect. Learn your basic Double Spey and Snap T casts with the floater and then move into the InTouch setup. Getting some lessons is the best way to learn.
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post #8 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 02:43 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you for advice,I was thinking the Rio switch chucker is specifically designed for switch rod, I will try skagit head for sure .
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I believe you would be much happier with a shorter Skagit, or perhaps a Rage Scandi type line. I would go with a short-head Skagit line around 550 grains if you want to toss tips and a slightly lighter Rage for dry line work. One can toss longer heads with shorter rods but it is much more difficult.
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post #9 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 02:49 PM Thread Starter
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Sorry, I didn't describe correctly, it's a switch chucker, 25 Ft 520gr, that specifically designed for switch rod. My streamer or tube fly are no weighted.
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Lots of unknowns here. I'm not familiar with this line. It was mentioned it's about 55', sounds midbelly'ish. Was it designed to carry tips or are you talking about a poly leader. Weighted fly like an intruder or something on the small side? What type of casting have you been attempting? Either way if you don't perform the lift correctly to get the line out of the water at the beginning of the cast the rest of it will never come together for you.

Dan
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post #10 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 02:56 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you folks for replying to my post, I would do little bit update. I tried change floating leader ,that much lighter and tried to cast double Spey and snap T , getting better now. I also changed to "Rio single handed Spey cast line", that is much better than Switch Chucker, easy to handling. All casting practices were doing in backyard on grass , does grass damage fly line?
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post #11 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 03:31 PM
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Dillon, you seem to be well underway now. You know what weight line is compatible with your rod, which will guide your future selections. There are about five spey casts, plus some variations and hybrid versions. Plan to learn at least most of them in the future, so that you can deal with contrary winds, or cover a specific lie. Learn to cast with either hand up; it may sound daunting, but it comes easily enough. You'll probably find that one cast is most compatible with your bodily response (I use the double spey most of the time), but try the other spey casts perhaps once every day, to keep from getting in a rut.
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post #12 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 04:01 PM
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If you're practicing on grass, your problem is probably no anchor. Spey casting utilizes the surface tension of the water to proved an anchor point against which you load the rod.

Search on speypages or on RIO's site for a grass anchor that you can make yourself. It's a monofilament leader with a blood knot every couple inches, with tag ends left a couple inches long. The tag ends create "grip" in the grass along the leader, somewhat like surface tension on water.

Your 525 should be about right, and shouldn't have any trouble throwing a tip.
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post #13 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 05:02 PM Thread Starter
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Five Spey cast? I googled, could not find answer. Could you please give me a Link? Thank you .
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Dillon, you seem to be well underway now. You know what weight line is compatible with your rod, which will guide your future selections. There are about five spey casts, plus some variations and hybrid versions. Plan to learn at least most of them in the future, so that you can deal with contrary winds, or cover a specific lie. Learn to cast with either hand up; it may sound daunting, but it comes easily enough. You'll probably find that one cast is most compatible with your bodily response (I use the double spey most of the time), but try the other spey casts perhaps once every day, to keep from getting in a rut.
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post #14 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 05:05 PM Thread Starter
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You are right Sir, I found out this problem, but didn't know how to fix it. Thank you so much for the great advice. I will make one for sure.
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If you're practicing on grass, your problem is probably no anchor. Spey casting utilizes the surface tension of the water to proved an anchor point against which you load the rod.

Search on speypages or on RIO's site for a grass anchor that you can make yourself. It's a monofilament leader with a blood knot every couple inches, with tag ends left a couple inches long. The tag ends create "grip" in the grass along the leader, somewhat like surface tension on water.

Your 525 should be about right, and shouldn't have any trouble throwing a tip.
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post #15 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-17-2020, 05:10 PM
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My first switch/spey rod was a Redington 11'3" for 8wt. I paired it with a #8 Switch Chucker (520gr) and found it very easy to cast - in the river. I wouldn't spend much time trying to learn to cast on a lawn. Even a lake or pond is better to learn casts like the switch cast.
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