River Left, Snap T in fast current help - Spey Pages
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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-19-2019, 03:20 PM Thread Starter
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River Left, Snap T in fast current help

I recently swung a new river left spot on an OP coastal river. It was necessary to cast to a very fast inside seam and let the downstream swing occur as the river made a right turn that entered a spot where holding Coho were rising. My lack of skill made this dangerous. My anchor travelled very quickly downstream after setting the anchor. Great load on the rod, but it seemed I had to do the sweep into a D-loop immediately to avoid being smacked on my right hand side or back. I tried setting the anchor angled further out and shrink the D-loop, but still needed needed to sweep instantaneously upon accomplishing the snap T. Maybe I am still going back more than I need to. Any advice?
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-19-2019, 04:10 PM
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Sounds like it would be a good spot to utilize a single Spey.

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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-19-2019, 04:35 PM
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You might try setting the anchor further upstream to give you some time for your sweep. This can be done several ways. In these situations I usually use more of circle spey instead of the snap and don't finish quite so far below you, which will place the anchor further upstream. Depending on the current speed you are dealing with, and how far upstream you place the anchor, will dictate how quick you must do your sweep so there still is some adjustments that have to be done. Good luck.
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-19-2019, 06:17 PM
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As unch stated, a single spey/splash and go type cast would work well. Keep the anchor well out and away from you. A lot of the time I tend to make a down stream snake roll to aerialize the line then pull back into the d-loop. The anchor touches down and I let go with forward cast. The current wouldn't have enough time to affect the anchor position this way.

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Which way to the river?
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-19-2019, 07:52 PM Thread Starter
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Thank’s for the prompt replies gentlemen. Seems obvious these methods will work now that you have mentioned them. I have been stuck in a rut, limiting myself to the few Spey casts that have work well for me.
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-19-2019, 08:59 PM
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This is an alternative to the snap T which may be applicable for you:

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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-19-2019, 10:29 PM
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Consider working on the single spey and a left-handed snake roll as either would, as mentioned above, neatly eliminate this problem. A left handed or cack-handed double spey would also relieve you of some safety issues due to the fast current. Since all those have many other uses it is a great impetus to learn them. Wind of course truncates the list if it is strong enough.

Otherwise what Put said, the snap-t can place the anchor as far upstream as necessary, and it is then only necessary to get your timing down. Consider taking a few steps back if possible as well. If you are not comfortable with the speed the anchor is moving then even if you are forced to do a poke closer to the bank if you can find a little slower moving water to work with it might help. But basically the straightforward solution is just to place the anchor up stream more and/or bring up the pace to get off the cast before it drifts too far down. You could in a pinch try a so-called “triple spey”: cast the line straight upstream and as it is coming downstream do a “double spey” on the upstream side. I only suggest this if it makes you feel more comfortable with the timing, but that is in essence just the extreme case of what Put suggested. But if you keep the anchor in front of you, watch it’s location, and don’t get bullheaded and try to cast over it it will eliminate a lot of the safety issues, but maybe not the issue of the aim you need to hit your spot. Just cast further down stream or start over.

I disagree about the “rewind” cast, which is basically just an upright and behind the back snap t. They are easy to do, but short of showing off there is really nothing recommending them in the situation you described. They achieve the same results and would have the same problems as a snap t for you unless there is a very strong wind directly in your face, in which case they solve ONLY the problem of the line blowing into your face on the repositioning move. I had a chance to do a lot of these most of one day this spring when swinging for Shad and the wind was like 35 mph and perfectly quartered upstream directly in our faces. They made it safer in the wind, and arguably more graceful, to reposition the line to the exact same place as a regular snap-t, but my fishing buddies did fine doing pokes into the wind until things calmed down. They don’t make it any easier to do the forward cast into the wind of course, and they will not do anything to help you with the timing issues you are having in fast water.

We all face issues like this often and I find it useful to mentally fall back on the “by any means necessary, style points be dammed” attitude. Laughing at yourself can help a lot - just be safe. But probably in your off time work on, in this order: changing the initial position of the anchor with your snap t << practice doing some poke and re-pokes to deal with similar situations << left hand or cack hand double spey << right hand single spey << left hand snake roll. Switch to practicing your behind the back snap t whenever pretty girls are watching!
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-20-2019, 01:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Botsari View Post
We all face issues like this often and I find it useful to mentally fall back on the “by any means necessary, style points be dammed” attitude. Laughing at yourself can help a lot - just be safe.
What he said!

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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-20-2019, 11:13 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks Carlton, Bostari & Eastside for adding your advice. Printing this stuff out and will work on these casts and anchor position changes. My partner says learn to left hand cast & do the Poke. I have had to often make minor adjustments to my go to river right double Spey and river left snap T to consistently make good casts, but this particular fast current situation frustrated me. Right side of my wading jacket looked like a Christmas tree. Left the fish unmolested.
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-20-2019, 11:21 AM
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Cack hand or left hand up double spey as mentioned may be a easy option as mentioned if the wind allows. Generally I try to avoid the double spey on river left if I am trying to angle my cast down river (but use it a lot when casting more straight across or upstream). The snap t or a single spey is more conducive for that rover left downstream angle. However in the situation you are describing, once you set the double spey, the anchor is likely to end a little more downstream from you due to the current which can facilitate more of a down stream angle than usual. Lots of good ideas, and as you become more comfortable with various casts you will start to change up your casts as the situation dictates. Yes, my jacket has often been decorated and still does more often than I like!
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post #11 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-20-2019, 04:17 PM
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In the spirit of “by any mean necessary”, and because they have not been mentioned yet. ... side-armed casts. Learning to do a more sidearmed cast has a bunch of uses. You have to up the tempo of the cast for obvious reasons, but when you start playing around with different anchor placements in your snap t or other casts sometimes it can help to get over the proper spot at the proper time. If you are used to casting more upright - good form generally - then trying to do so at the right time in fast water may be nerve-racking, giving you a very narrow margin of error. If you are snagging yourself as you say, then both flipping the anchor further upstream and doing a more side-armed cast might make it feel like there is more of a safety margin. All of this is only to say - extreme casts for extreme situations, style points be dammed. Side-armed is also useful for loads of other situations - good under trees, and virtually mandatory if the wind is very extreme and in your face where it can lower the time of flight, which of course under normal circumstance is the opposite of good style.

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post #12 of 13 (permalink) Unread Today, 07:09 AM
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Try to get comfortable using a cack handed double spey. I often fish close to brush where I constantly have to change from one style to another. Because of that a cack handed double spey has become second nature to me, and I often have better results with one of those rather than rushing or adjusting a snap T
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post #13 of 13 (permalink) Unread Today, 09:28 AM
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The double spey in a fast current will work better as your sweep will help to keep the anchor from moving down stream vs the snap t in this situation will actually pull your anchor downstream with the current. You can compensate for this like others have said by setting your anchor further upstream, but you might find it easier to just utilize the double spey.
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